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Mary Hatch Marshall photo

Each year, Library Associates presents the Mary Hatch Marshall Essay Award for the best essay written by a graduate student in the humanities at the University. The award, first presented in 2004, honors Mary Hatch Marshall, a co-founder of the Library Associates (1953), who holds a distinguished place in the College’s history. In 1952, she became the Jesse Truesdell Peck Professor of English Literature—the first woman to be appointed a full professor in the College of Liberal Arts at Syracuse University—after having joined the faculty four years earlier.

The Mary Hatch Marshall Award is intended to honor and help perpetuate her scholarly standards and the generous spirit that characterized her inspirational teaching career, which lasted through her retirement in 1993. The award carries a cash prize of $1,000.

After Mary Hatch Marshall's death, Library Associates wanted to acknowledge her deep commitment to the organization since its founding. The 100th anniversary of Mary's birth and the 50th anniversary of Library Associates in 2003 provided the opportunity to establish the Mary Hatch Marshall Essay Award as a permanent memorial that would connect her passions for literature and for the Library. Members of Library Associates, Mary's friends and family, the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, and the Central New York Community Foundation all contributed to the endowment that funds this annual award for the best essay written by a graduate student in the humanities at Syracuse University.

Part-time and full-time graduate students currently enrolled in the following departments and programs are eligible for this award: African-American Studies; English; Art and Music Histories; Languages, Literatures and Linguistics (one each from French, Linguistics, and Spanish); Philosophy; Religion; Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies. Nominations are submitted by each of these programs to a faculty panel selected to judge the essays.

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