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Collis Potter Huntington Papers

An inventory of his papers at Syracuse University

Overview of the Collection

Creator: Huntington, Collis Potter, 1821-1900.
Title: Collis Potter Huntington Papers
Inclusive Dates: 1797-1904
Quantity: 120 linear ft.
Abstract: Papers of the American railroad magnate and capitalist, whose financial interests included steamship, manufacturing, construction, and land companies. Philanthropist, trustee of the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute and supporter of Tuskegee Institute. Collection includes incoming correspondence (1856-1904); letterpress copybooks (1868-1901); legal and financial (including real estate) records (1797-1901); amd personal papers (1862-1901). Notable among the real estate records are documents relating to the furnishing and household expenses of Huntington's San Francisco residence, and records relating to the design, construction, decoration, furnishing, and maintenance of Huntington's palatial home on 57th St. in New York City.
Language: English
Repository: Special Collections Research Center,
Syracuse University Libraries
222 Waverly Avenue
Syracuse, NY 13244-2010
http://scrc.syr.edu

Biographical History

Collis P. Huntington was born on October 22, 1821, in Harwinton, Connecticut, the sixth of nine children of Elizabeth and William Huntington. After a brief and perfunctory education, he was apprenticed at age fourteen to a neighboring farmer and the following year to a local grocer. Between the ages of sixteen and twenty-one, he was an itinerant note collector in the South.

In 1842, Huntington purchased a partnership in his brother's hardware store in Oneonta, New York. It was here that he married Elizabeth Stoddard in 1844. In 1849, he went to California by way of Panama with a group of Oneontans. He entered the hardware business in Sacramento, and by 1855 was joined by Mark Hopkins in the hardware firm of Huntington & Hopkins, one of the largest of its kind on the West Coast. This partnership lasted until 1867.

With Mark Hopkins, Charles Crocker, a dealer in dry goods, and Leland Stanford, a grocer, Huntington was one of the founders of California's Republican Party. He worked for the admission of California as a free state in 1850, and later supported Abraham Lincoln for president.

A Railroad Tycoon

Huntington's railroad career began in 1861 when he, Mark Hopkins, Leland Stanford, Charles Crocker and others formed the Central Pacific Railroad Company. In 1862 the company received a loan from the Federal government to build the western end of the first transcontinental railroad. A further incentive was provided in 1864 when Congress promised to give the company 12,800 acres of adjoining Federal lands for each mile of track laid; the Central Pacific received some 9,497,600 acres. Finally in May, 1869, the Central Pacific and the Union Pacific connected in Utah and the first transcontinental railroad was completed.

In December, 1862, Huntington moved to New York City to serve as financier, purchasing agent, legal adviser, and Washington lobbyist for the Central Pacific. As soon as the transcontinental line was completed, Huntington began to purchase twenty-three separate railroad companies in California. Although he thought of selling his Central Pacific stock in 1871, he was already far too involved in building and acquiring transportation systems to quit the field. The financial panic of 1873 put him under great financial strain, but neither he nor the Central Pacific defaulted on their loans.

In the late 1870's Huntington was instrumental in financing and building the Southern Pacific system. Completed in 1883, the Southern Pacific ran from California to New Orleans. Eventually the Central Pacific and Southern Pacific systems were consolidated into one transcontinental railroad company with 9,000 miles of tracks and 16,000 miles of water transportation systems. Huntington succeeded Leland Stanford as president of the Southern Pacific Company in 1890. In 1892, Henry E. Huntington, Collis' nephew, became vice-president of the company and increasingly carried on his uncle's business enterprises.

During the building of the Southern Pacific, Huntington also served as president and director of the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad Company. When this company was sold at a foreclosure sale in 1878, Huntington purchased the road and continued to manage it until 1888 when he sold his shares and the company was reorganized. The eastern terminus of the Chesapeake & Ohio was Newport News, Virginia, where Huntington later established the Chesapeake Dry Dock & Construction Company. The western terminus of the road was Huntington, West Virginia. Both of these cities, built under the supervision of Huntington, were built on property owned by land companies controlled by Huntington.

A Baron of Finance and Political Lobbying

Huntington's financial interests in railroads, steamship companies, land companies, as well as many manufacturing and construction companies, made him an extremely powerful financial figure. His influence an Congress was considerable. As such, during his thirty-nine years as a railroad financier and builder, Huntington faced opposition from both Congress and the press. In 1887, for instance, the Interstate Commerce Commission outlawed rebates, while the United States Pacific Railway Commission was investigating to determine whether Leland Stanford and Huntington had used bribery with Congressmen to obtain favorable railroad legislation. These charges were never proved. Huntington was such an adroit lobbyist that he could obtain preferential legislation at the same time as he was being investigated by Congress.

Philanthropic Activities

Philanthropy is an aspect of Huntington's life which is little known. He established the Huntington Industrial Works at Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, of which he was a trustee. He financially aided Booker T. Washington's Tuskegee Institute. Huntington was an avid book collector and connoisseur of fine art. His art collection was given to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. His fortune went into the founding of such institutions as the Henry E. Huntington Library, the Hispanic Society of America, and the Mariners' Museum.

Family History

In September, 1844, Huntington married Elizabeth Stoddard. Having no children of their own, they adopted Mrs. Huntington's niece, Clara Prentice, later the Princess Clara von Hatzveldt. Elizabeth Huntington died in 1883 and in 1884 Huntington married Mrs. Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham and adopted her son, Archer Milton. Collis P. Huntington died suddenly on August 13, 1900, at the age of seventy-nine. Arabella Huntington later married her late husband's nephew, Henry E. Huntington, and died in New York on September 16, 1924.

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Scope and Contents of the Collection

The Collis P. Huntington Papers have been arranged into four series: Incoming correspondence (1856-1904), Letterpress copy books (1868-1901), Legal and financial records (1797-1901), and Personal papers (1862-1901). Each of these series is described in detail below.

By far the most important and most voluminous parts of this collection consists of Huntington's business and personal correspondence, contained in Series I and II -- some 129,000 pages of incoming correspondence, 1856-1904, and some 112,000 pages of letterpress copy books (259 volumes) of outgoing correspondence, 1868-1901. The correspondents are primarily railroad financiers, officials and administrators, congressmen, lobbyists, industrialists, bankers, lawyers and engineers. A summary of the contents of the correspondence by decade is given below, and a selected index to correspondents is also available.

The highlight of the correspondence comprises the letters of Huntington and those of his five main associates, David D. Colton, Charles Crocker, Edwin B. Crocker, Mark Hopkins, and Leland Stanford. The correspondence of these six men opens in 1868 and continues to the years of their deaths. Their letters deal with both business and personal matters including construction, maintenance and operation of their railroads, and their problems in public relations and legislative restrictions. Important correspondents include the following:

  • Anderson, James
  • Anthony, Susan B.
  • Armstrong, Samuel Chapman
  • Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad
  • Atlantic & Pacific Telegraph Co.
  • Axtel, Samuel B.
  • Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co.
  • Barney & Smith Manufacturing Co.
  • Bierstadt, Albert
  • Blaine, James G.
  • Bloss, John B.
  • Boyd, John
  • California Pacific Railroad
  • Carnegie, Andrew
  • Central Land Company of West Virginia
  • Central Pacific Railroad Co.
  • Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad Co.
  • Colton, David D.
  • Conkling, Roscoe
  • Conness, John
  • Crocker, Charles
  • Crocker, Charles Frederick
  • Crocker, Edwin B.
  • Dillon, Sidney
  • Echols, John
  • Elizabethtown, Lexington & Big Sandy Railroad
  • Emmons, D. W.
  • Field, Cyrus W.
  • Fisk & Hatch
  • Gates, Isaac E.
  • Gorham, George C. Grant, Ulysses S.
  • Gray, George E.
  • Hampton Normal & Agricultural Institute
  • Hopkins, Mark
  • Huntington, Henry E.
  • Ingalls, Melville E.
  • Judah, Anna
  • Kentucky Central Railroad Co.
  • Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • Miller, E. H., Jr.
  • Mills, William H.
  • Newport News & Mississippi Valley Co.
  • Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co.
  • New York Central & Hudson River Railroad Co.
  • Occidental & Oriental Steamship Co.
  • Old Dominion Land Co.
  • Old Dominion Steamship Co.
  • Pacific Improvement Co.
  • Pacific Mail Steamship Co.
  • Pennsylvania Railroad Co.
  • Pullman, George M.
  • Sargent, Aaron A.
  • Seligman, J.& W., Co.
  • Smithsonian Institution
  • Southern Development Co.
  • Southern Pacific Co.
  • Southern Pacific Railroad Co. of California
  • Speyer & Co.
  • Stanford, Leland
  • Towne, Alban N.
  • Tweed, Charles H.
  • Union Pacific Railroad Co.
  • Vanderbilt, Cornelius
  • Washington, Booker T.
  • Wells, Fargo & Co.
  • Westinghouse, George, Jr.

Incoming correspondence, 1856-1904 (microfilm reels 1 - 54), is arranged chronologically by year, month, and day, with undated items placed at the end of the month, year, or at the end of all the correspondence. Enclosures were microfilmed following their letter of transmittal. Included with the incoming correspondence are postcards, telegrams and cablegrams, telegraph tapes, memoranda, abstracts of letters, printed notices in letter form, and letters forwarded to Huntington by members of his staff.

Although the incoming correspondence begins in 1856, the bulk of the correspondence starts in 1867 and 1868. Incoming letters are addressed primarily to Huntington, with others addressed to Isaac Edwin Gates, his brother-in-law and private secretary, or to members of his New York office staff.

Over the years, Huntington's correspondence indicates the use of several cipher systems. Although the cipher code books are not available in this microfilm edition, there are many letters with word keys to Substitution codes. Cipher telegrams are generally accompanied by a translation.

Aside from the incoming correspondence, other locations in the collection contain correspondence. Correspondence relating to particular pieces of real estate and court cases was filed with these records in Series III. Series IV, Personal Papers, includes an autobiographical letter written by Huntington in 1899. This series also contains four printed volumes (90A-D) of Huntington's correspondence with his business associates.

Letterpress Copy Books, 1868-1901 (microfilm reels 1 - 35) contain copies of outgoing correspondence, 1868-1901. Nearly every volume has an alphabetical index arranged by last name or business name of the addressee. Each index was microfilmed at the beginning of each volume. The volumes are arranged into 34 groups (i.e., company or individual name) and then chronologically within each group. Only in a very few instances is this chronological order disrupted by a missing volume.

The 34 groups of letterpress copy books vary in size. Five of these groups concern the almost day-to-day accounts of the building of the Central Pacific Railroad: Central Pacific Railroad Company, Vols. 1 - 19; Central Pacific Railroad Company (Collis P. Huntington to Charles Crocker, Charles F. Crocker, Mark Hopkins, Leland Stanford, et. al.), Vols. 20 - 36; Central Pacific Railroad Company (Isaac E. Gates), Vols. 45 - 110; Contracting and Building Company, Vols 141 - 149; and telegrams, Vols. 257 - 259.

Other significant groups of letterpress copy books relate to the Chesapeake Dry Dock and Construction Company, the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad, the Southern Pacific Company, and the Elizabethtown, Lexington and Big Sandy Railroad Company. A complete citation for each volume can be found in the Complete Reel List (available in hard copy only, please contact the repository listed above for more information).

Legal and Financial Records, 1797-1901 (microfilm reels 1 - 23) includes material previously from the years 1863-1901. This series is divided into two sections, namely, Corporate, 1869-1900, and Personal, 1797-1901.

Corporate records, 1869-1900, include financial and business records for 34 companies in which Huntington had an interest. The files in this small section are arranged alphabetically by company name. The Complete Reel List (available in hard copy only, please contact the repository listed above for more information) lists each company. The types of records in this section include stock certificates, memoranda, articles of agreement, comparative statements of rates among railroads, bonds, court records, option agreements, mortgages, indentures, inventories, and numerous addition types of financial records.

Personal records, 1797-1901, are subdivided into Account Books, Civil Suits, Personal Bills, Real Estate, Miscellaneous.

Account books: begins with 19 volumes (35-53) of Huntington's personal financial records including cash books, 1875-1890; day books, 1871-1876; journals, 1886-1898; and ledgers, 1890-1893. Related to these volumes are 4 investment ledgers, 1876-1902 (63-66), and 5 record books of loans payable and receivable, 1867-1900 (67-71).

Civil suits: An important category in this section is court case records of civil suits, 1879-1897 (54-62), which directly or indirectly relate to Huntington. These records include printed court records, depositions, holograph notes by defense lawyers, correspondence, and supporting materials which include account books, statements of account, deposit tags, check books, and lists. The individual case records are arranged alphabetically by case name. Where volume required, materials relating to a case were arranged by type of record.

Two court cases require special mention. The largest group of records relate to the 1883 civil suit brought by Ellen M. Colton (Mrs. David D.) against Leland Stanford et. al (56). Mrs. Colton believed that the Central Pacific Railroad Company had swindled her out of company securities owned by her late husband. The case, which lasted 2 years, resulted in 24 printed volumes of court testimony, as well as a quantity of material prepared by the defense lawyers and a quantity of David D. Colton's personal financial records. The other important case represented is Edward J. Muybridge v. Leland Stanford, 1883 (59A-59D). In 1872 Muybridge was commissioned by Stanford to photograph a horse at full gallop in order to determine if at any point all four feet were off the ground. The film indicated there was such a point. Subsequently Stanford published some of these photographs and attempted to secure a patent on the design of the photographic apparatus used by Muybridge. Muybridge sued on the grounds that credit had not been given for his published photographs and that since he designed the apparatus, Stanford was not entitled to a patent. It is unclear why these court case records appear in Huntington's papers.

Personal bills: Huntington's personal bills and receipts, 1863-1900 (72), are arranged into loose bills, 1863-1895, which are arranged chronologically by year and month; and three volumes of chronologically arranged mounted bills, 1892-1900. These bills are primarily for personal and household expenses. Included are bills Huntington received in furnishing his various residences.

Real estate: Huntington's real estate records, 1797-1901 (73-124), consist of correspondence, bills, receipts, indentures, contracts, bills of sale, mortgages, deeds, vouchers, maps, blueprints, and two volumes (123-124) of property accounts. Bills dealing with real estate may also be found among personal bills. The real estate records are arranged alphabetically by locale: by state, City and street address, in that order. Among New York City property ' it is important to note that arrangement is alphabetical by the spelling of numbered street names.

Of particular interest are the records dealing with the purchase and furnishing of the Nob Hill home of David D: Colton (74), as well as documents relating to the design, construction, decoration, furnishing, and maintenance of Huntington's palatial residence at 2 West Fifty-Seventh Street in New York City (100). The collection also contains materials regarding the remodeling of Huntington's country home at Throgg's Neck (112). There are materials dealing with the design and construction of a chapel in memory of Huntington's mother in Harwinton, Connecticut (79), and records of construction and operating expenses for a public library and reading room maintained by Huntington in Westchester, New York (113).

Miscellaneous: This material includes statements of account, 1869-1900 (125-126), miscellaneous financial records, 1872-1898 (127), and a copy of Huntington's will, 1897 (128).

The statements of accounts include the following records. Huntington's accounts with Huntington-Hopkins, Central Pacific Railroad Company, Southern Pacific, and Pacific Improvement Company. Comparative statements of accounts of Leland Stanford, Huntington, estate of Mark Hopkins, Mrs. M.F. Searles, Charles Crocker, and Stillman & Hubbard with the Pacific Improvement, Southern Development, and Southern Pacific companies. Statements of cash receipts and disbursements for the accounts of Huntington, Leland Stanford, Mrs. M.F. Searles, and Charles Crocker. Individual statements of account of Mrs. M.F. Searles with the Pacific Improvement Company, Leland Stanford with the Pacific Improvement Company, and Arabella D. Huntington with the Southern Pacific Company.

There are, in addition, a list of loans to C.P. Huntington an Wells, Fargo & Company Express stock; a list of properties in which Stanford, Huntington and Charles Crocker had interests; a comparative statement of the assets of the estate of Mark Hopkins, December 31, 1878, and of Mrs. M.F. Searles, December 31, 1887; a readjustment of notes of Stanford, Huntington, Charles Crocker, and Mrs. Searles with the Pacific Improvement Company; and a statement of account between Stanford and Huntington arising from Stanford's subscription to the Contracting & Building Company and his interest in the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway Syndicate.

Personal Papers, 1862-1901 (microfilm reels 1 - 3) are arranged into the following sections: biographical material, material relating to Collis P. Huntington's business and philanthropic interests, miscellaneous, memorabilia, and printed matter. Each section will be described in detail.

Biographical material, 1862-1899 (1-4), includes a lang autobiographical letter written to James Speyer, December 6, 1899; autobiographical notes by Huntington edited by Charles Nordhoff; genealogical material collected by the Rev. E.B. Huntington; and Huntington's personal memorandum book, 1862-1868.

Material relating to Collis P. Huntington's business and philanthropic interests, 1865-1900 (5-54), are arranged alphabetically by company name and include minutes, reports to stockholders and boards of directors, prospectuses, lists, printed circulars, reports, resolutions, proposals, maps, and blue prints. There is no more than one folder of material for each company. There are some important business records in this section that relate to Huntington's broad business interests.

Miscellaneous records, 1885-1898 (55-60), include railroad reports, reports an possible financial ventures, and stock exchange statements.

Memorabilia, 1875-1934 (61-82), includes newspaper clippings, 1879-1934; photographs of Huntington; specifications for Huntington's private railroad cars and his steam yacht; and an index to transportation articles and references in the New York Tribune, 1875-1902. A complete list of all entries is provided in the Complete Reel List (available in hard copy only, please contact the repository listed above for more information).

Printed matter, 1873-1899 (83-96), includes primarily pamphlets relating to Huntington's railroad interests. The pamphlets are arranged alphabetically by title. The Complete Reel List (available in hard copy only, please contact the repository listed above for more information) provides a full bibliographic entry for each printed item.

Of particular importance are four volumes of printed correspondence published between 1891 and 1894 in a very limited edition. These four volumes contain edited versions of letters, 1867-1879, exchanged between Huntington and his associates, David D. Colton, Charles Crocker, Charles F. Crocker, Edwin B. Crocker, and Leland Stanford. In many instances these printed letters can be compared to the originals in Series I & II, which sometimes carry pencil notations such as "Don't Print". These letters are not indexed.

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Arrangement of the Collection

See Scope and content above. Note that Boxes 199-218 no longer exist; their contents have been transferred to phase boxes (Oversize packages 1-24).

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Restrictions

Access Restrictions

The majority of our archival and manuscript collections are housed offsite and require advanced notice for retrieval. Researchers are encouraged to contact us in advance concerning the collection material they wish to access for their research.

Use Restrictions

Written permission must be obtained from SCRC and all relevant rights holders before publishing quotations, excerpts or images from any materials in this collection.

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Related Material

The entire collection is also available on microfilm, both at Syracuse University and at numerous other academic institutions across the country.

A microfilm version of the Collis P. Huntington Papers (Microfilm #5022) is available.

See also the following:

Anna Hyatt Huntington Papers
Arabella Huntington Papers
Archer Milton Huntington Papers
Huntington Estate Papers

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Subject Headings

Persons

Ames, Oakes, 1804-1873.
Anthony, Susan B. (Susan Brownell), 1820-1906.
Armstrong, S. C. (Samuel Chapman), 1839-1893.
Axtell, Samuel B. (Samuel Beach), 1819-1891.
Blaine, James Gillespie, 1830-1893.
Bonn, William B.
Boruck, Marcus D. (Marcus Derckheim), 1833 or 4-1895.
Boyd, John.
Cesnola, Luigi Palma di, 1832-1904.
Chandler, William E. (William Eaton), 1835-1917.
Colton, David Douty, 1832-1878.
Conness, John.
Crocker, Charles F.
Crocker, Charles, 1822-1888.
Crocker, E. B. (Edwin Bryant), 1818-1875.
Echols, John.
Flagg, John Henry, 1843-1911.
Fox, Francis W.
Franchot, Richard.
Gates, Isaac Edwin.
Gilman, F. N.
Gorham, George Congdon, 1832-1909.
Gould, Jay, 1836-1892.
Grant, Ulysses S. (Ulysses Simpson), 1822-1885.
Hopkins, Mark, 1813-1878.
Huntington, Collis Potter, 1821-1900 Archives.
Judah, Anna Pierce, 1828-1895.
Miller, Edwin H.
Mills, William H.
Prince, L. Bradford (Le Baron Bradford), 1840-1922.
Sargent, A. A. (Aaron Augustus), 1827-1887.
Sherrill, Charles H.
Stanford, Jane Lathrop, 1828-1905.
Stanford, Leland, 1824-1893.
Stewart, William M. (William Morris), 1827-1909.
Storrs, James.
Strong, William B.
Towne, Alban Nelson, 1829-
Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915.
Wickham, Williams Carter, 1820-1888.
Williams, George Washington, 1849-1891.
Woodward, J. H.

Corporate Bodies

Central Pacific Railroad Company.
Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad Company.
Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute (Va.)
Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company.
Southern Pacific Railroad Company.
United States., Interstate Commerce Commission.

Subjects

California, History, 1850-1950.
Capitalists and financiers, United States.
Ciphers.
Entrepreneurship.
Palaces -- United States.
Philanthropists -- United States.
Railroad law -- United States.
Railroads -- California.
Railroads -- Freight -- Rates.
Railroads -- History.
Railroads -- United States.
Railroads and state -- United States.
Upper class -- United States.

Places

United States -- History -- 1865-1898.
United States -- Politics and government -- 19th century.
United States -- Social life and customs -- 19th century.

Genres and Forms

Account books.
Bills of sale.
Blueprints (reprographic copies)
Clippings (information artifacts)
Correspondence.
Daybooks.
Deeds.
Ledgers (account books)
Letterpress copybooks.
Maps.
Mortgages.
Photographs.
Receipts (financial records)
Stock certificates.

Occupations

Capitalists and financiers.
Entrepreneurs.
Philanthropists.

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Decade summaries of correspondence

1860s

The correspondence of the 1860s deals mainly with the financing and construction of the Central Pacific Railroad. There is no correspondence dealing with the legislative maneuvers which brought the transcontinental railroad into being, rather the letters begin after construction on the Central Pacific had already begun. There are numerous cost estimates and time schedules for the completion of the road, as well as discussions of the land grant provisions for construction. Chinese laborers were brought to California to build the Central Pacific and mention is made of both their industriousness and an occasional strike for better wages. The take over of the Western Pacific Railroad by the Central Pacific is detailed in this period. Many of the telegrams between Huntington, Stanford, Hopkins, and Edwin and Charles F. Crocker are in cipher, though the translation is often supplied. In these early years of the Central Pacific the associates occasionally make personal comments about one another.

Huntington's attempt, ultimately unsuccessful with the defeat of a Congressional bill in 1873, to obtain Goat Island in San Francisco Bay as the western terminus for his road is discussed in the 1860s as are the various routes by which the Central Pacific could cut through the Sierras.

Once the road was completed in 1869, Huntington received many requests for passes, from U.S. Senators and fellow railroad officers to authors and missionaries. The requests for passes continue throughout the years. Letters of introduction from job-seekers are numerous. Monthly earnings reports from the Central Pacific begin and continue throughout this period.

The provision of the federal subsidy by which the railroad would carry the mails and troops comes under fire almost immediately after the completion of the road. The associates voice their complaint that they received too small a compensation from the government. This topic occupies their correspondence on and off for about ten years.

The correspondence for the 1860s also concerns the hardware business of Huntington and Hopkins which the two partners sold to their clerks in 1867. The letters from the reorganized Huntington, Hopkins and Co. outline the profits Huntington derived from the one-tenth interest he retained.

1870s

The 1870s witness the expansion of Huntington's roads, particularly the Chesapeake and Ohio and the Southern Pacific. The officers of the various roads report their monthly earnings, and comment on problems in both construction of new roads and upkeep of completed roads due to weather, accident, or an occasional robbery. They also lament the lack of qualified locomotive engineers, conductors, and motive power. Manufacturers of railroad materials, rails, iron, lumber, locomotives and rolling stock, solicited business from Huntington's lines, while producers of foodstuffs and dry goods sought preferential rates.

Donations were sought by a number of groups such as colleges, missionary societies and the like. Few of these people received money from Huntington though a notable exception was the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute in Hampton, Virginia. Huntington was always sympathetic to the lot of blacks in the United States and favored education as the way to self-sufficiency. Huntington built a sawmill for the Institute and annually donated scholarships. The letters of Samuel C. Armstrong, principle of the Hampton Institute, testify to the aid Huntington gave. Huntington later helped Booker T. Washington, a Hampton Institute graduate himself, to establish Tuskegee Institute in Alabama.

In 1872 the Credit Mobilier scandal is a topic of discussion. So too is the Contract and Finance Company which was the Central Pacific's counterpart of the Union Pacific's Credit Mobilier Company. The railroad owned the construction company to which it awarded inflated contracts thereby pocketing huge profits and at public expense as it was government money. The railroad, in effect, created its own middle man which it could then control. Charles F. Crocker was the middleman for the Contract and Finance Company.

The opening of the transcontinental railroad put a crimp in the profits of those steamship companies who transported goods from the Orient around the Cape. The Pacific Mail Steamship Company, which was partially owned by stock speculator and manipulator Jay Gould, in 1874 refused to send goods by way of the railroads. Huntington countered by forming his own steamship line to feed Asiatic goods to the Central Pacific.

Realizing he would need the cooperation of Gould, who owned the Union Pacific, Huntington formed the Occidental and Oriental Steamship Company with Gould. Shortly thereafter the Pacific Mail Steamship Company began again to ship goods by rail.

Huntington's lang range plan to build a transcontinental railroad wholly owned by himself was in part influenced by a desire to avoid problems, such as the above with Gould. The Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad was planned as the eastern end of such a road. Monthly reports on the progress and earnings of the Chesapeake and Ohio are found in the correspondence. There are also references to the building of Huntington, West Virginia, which Huntington intended as the western terminus of the Chesapeake and Ohio. In expanding the Chesapeake and Ohio westward Huntington bought out financially troubled railroads, the first of which was the Elizabethtown, Lexington and Big Sandy Railroad. The correspondence of John Echols and attorney William Breckinridge detail both the construction and legal problems surrounding the Elizabethtown, Lexington and Big Sandy Railroad, where virtually any sizable town in Kentucky through which it passed started a legal battle over the right of way.

There appears in the incoming correspondence personal letters to Huntington from friends and relatives, though not in any volume. Beginning in 1876 and continuing on and off through 1893 there are letters from Mrs. Anna Judah, widow of surveying engineer Theodore Judah. Judah became involved with California railroads in 1854 when he surveyed a route for the Sacramento Valley Railroad and later surveyed a route for the San Francisco and Sacramento Railroad. Judah also acted as a Lobbyist for the latter road trying to entice prospective stockholders and advocating Federal aid to build intra-state feeder lines which would insure traffic for the proposed transcontinental railroad. In 1859, Judah helped organize a statewide convention on the building of the Pacific Railroad, which then sent him to Congress to lobby for the transcontinental.

Supporters of the railroad in California were divided over which route the transcontinental should follow. The route would determine the terminus of the road, in effect determing what area of California would reap financial benefits. In 1860, Judah set about to form his own railroad company and among the prospective stockholders in Sacramento was Collis P. Huntington, by this time a well-to-do and respected businessman. Judah sought money to complete the survey of the line and lay enough track to satisfy the federal subsidy provisions. After much discussion Huntington and Mark Hopkins each invested $1500 and took Judah in as an equal partner.

By June of 1861 the associates of the Central Pacific Railroad Company filed articles of incorporation with the secretary of state of California. Leland Stanford, soon to be governor of California, was elected president; Huntington, vice-president; Judah, chief engineer; and Mark Hopkins, treasurer. Judah surveyed the line and lobbyed in Congress. When the associates subscribed to the Central Pacific stock they did so on the margin system. In 1863, Huntington called for additional funds from the stockholders in order to complete enough track to get federal money. Judah sold his interest in the company to Charles F. Crocker for $10,000, while retaining an open option to buy further shares. In November 1863, Judah and his wife Anna sailed for New York to raise money. Theodore contracted tropical fever while crossing through Panama and died shortly after his arrival in New York.

Anna Judah always feit it was her husband's efforts which allowed Huntington and his associates to build the transcontinental railroad which made them all very wealthy men and said so in her letter to Huntington. Apparently Anna would write numerous appeals after which Huntington would advance her money usually as a mortgage on some of her property.

Among the correspondents of the 1870s is Huntington's nephew, Henry Edward Huntington. Though Henry would later become an officer of the Southern Pacific Railroad and marry his uncle's widow, only his early correspondence is represented in this series. Henry's early letters ask his Uncle Collis for money to start a business. While inspecting the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad, Huntington purchased a saw mill in St. Albans, West Virginia, and put Henry in charge in partnership with Richard Franchot, chief congressional lobbyist for the Central Pacific. After returning to the family business in Oneonta, New York, for a few years, Henry reappears as an engineer on the western extension of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad.

Lobbyist Franchot, formerly a Congressman from Schenectady, New York, who had served on the House Select Committee on the Pacific Railroad, kept Huntington informed of Congressional actions regarding railroads.

John Boyd was another of Huntington's congressional "look outs" on Congress whose official title in 1875 was "Ass't Doorkeeper in the Capitol Building." Boyd and Franchot sent reports to Huntington concerning the various bills before Congress affecting his railroads. By these reports Huntington knew who his friends were in Congress and also whom he should try to influence. John Boyd often sent newspaper clippings relevant to Huntington's interests. When Richard Franchot died in 1876, Charles Sherrill took his position with the official title "Advisor and Agent of the Central Pacific Railroad in the City of Washington before Congress and the Departments."

David D. Colton joined the associates in 1873 and was soon made president of the Rocky Mountain Coal and Iron Company of Wyoming. By mid-1874, Huntington realized Colton's talents and sent him to Washington to work as a lobbyist for the Southern Pacific. There are many of Colton's letters in this series; they cover the period from 1873 to his death in 1878.

Beginning in the 1870s and continuing to the end of the correspondence are letters calling for interest payments on Central Pacific bonds, as well as the bonds of Huntington's other roads. Some came from large investment houses such as Speyer & Co. in Germany who held millions of dollars of bonds in Huntington's railroads. Other calls for interest payments came from banks, both large and small, law firms seeking redress for their clients, and private investors. There are a few letters from Congressmen asking Huntingtn's advice on what stocks and bonds would be safe purchases.

The letters of Charles F. Crocker and Mark Hopkins testify to the problem of raising cash to pay both interest on the bonds and to continue construction on new lines. Congress early realized that if railroads had difficulty paying interest on their bonds they would also have difficulty paying their debts to the government. Congress passed the Thurman Act which created a sinking fund to which the railroads would contribute out of their net earnings to repay government loans. The Thurman Act is a topic of discussion in the letters of Boyd and Sherrill in 1878.

A man of Huntington's position, head of an expanding railroad empire, could command an influence in both national and local politics. For example, in 1878, when Samuel Axtell and T.B. Catron, respectively governor and U.S. attorney for the Territory of New Mexico, are threatened with removal they write to Huntington and ask him to use his influence to protect their jobs.

As mentioned above, Huntington had as one of his aims the construction of a transcontinental rail system wholly owned by himself. Thomas Scott, president of the Pennsylvania Railroad, had the same goal. In 1868 Scott met with Huntington and told him of his plan to build a transcontinental railroad along a southerly route terminating in the proposed Southern Pacific Railroad, which at that time was only a paper road. Scott offered to buy out Huntington's interest with a small piece of Scott's proposed construction company (the Central Pacific was not yet completed). Huntington begged off and completed his own negotiations for the Southern Pacific. Scott's next attempt at his own transcontinental system came in 1870 with the Texas Pacific Railroad Bill which is discussed in the correspondence. The bill would allow Scott to build new roads and buy up old ones and gave him a virtual monopoly on Texas roads.

1880s

The 1880s see the further expansion of Huntington's railroads. Details leading to Huntington gaining a controlling interest in the Galveston, Harrisburg, and San Antonio Railroad can be found in the correspondence, particularly in the letters of Thomas Peirce, president of the Galveston, Harrisburg, and San Antonio Railroad. Control of this line gave Huntington the foothold he needed in Texas (for which the Southern Pacific had no charter to build), and effectively stopped the Texas and Pacific which was now owned by Jay Gould.

By this time in the correspondence there are a myriad of letterheads for Huntington's railroads and construction companies. The construction companies were set up along the same lines as the now defunct Contract and Finance Company (which had been dissolved in 1873). The Pacific Improvement Company was Huntington's construction company for the Southern Development Company in New Mexico. The Chesapeake and Ohio's construction firm was the Contracting and Building Company, which built the Maysville and Big Sandy extension of the Chesapeake and Ohio. Details leading to the takeover of the Maysville and Big Sandy Railroad can be found in the correspondence. The problems of buying land and obtaining rights of waycontinued in Kentucky.

The development of Newport News begins in this period. Huntington planned Newport News as both a harbor terminus of the Chesapeake and Ohio and as a ship building and dry dock center. As with the railroads there soon began monthly progress reports and then monthly earnings reports. There is also correspondence dealing with the building of the Southern Pacific Railroad in Arizona and New Mexico.

In 1882, Boyd and Sherrillreported an a bill to limit Chinese immigration. This bill was of importance to Huntington as it would limit his supply of cheap labor to build his railroads. The lobbyists also report on congressional action to forfeit land grants to the railroads on which proposed lines had not yet begun. Huntington also received letters and flyers from inventors and distributors of new safety gear, such as air brakes, improved car couplers, railroad crossing gates, and even a patented passenger car spittoon. Mrs. David D. Colton brought suit against the Central Pacific in 1882. When her husband joined the associates he was offered twenty thousand shares in both the Central and Southern Pacific Railroads in return for which he signed a note for one million dollars which would fall due in October 1879. After Colton's death in 1878, bookkeepers discovered that Colton had misappropriated company funds in anticipation of his inability to pay the million dollar note. Huntington, Stanford, and Crocker told Mrs. Colton they would cancel the note if she turned over the securities that her husband held in their companies. They assured her this was a fair bargain as the securities were not worth a million dollars. She then agreed. When Mrs. Colton read newspaper accounts of the value of the estate of Mark Hopkins she believed she had been swindled and brought suit. While she ultimately lost her case she gave much ammunition to Huntington's detractors by reading many of Huntington's letters to her husband into the court record. The letters gave accounts of money Huntington paid to Congressmen, as well as his efforts to manipulate legislation. Letters concerning Mrs. Colton's case are numerous.

Evidence of philanthropy on Huntington's part are scant. As mentioned above, Huntington donated money to the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute in Alabama. There is also correspondence from Booker T. Washington of Tuskegee Institute. Apparently Huntington also gave money to the Pacific Theological Seminary in California, and there are letters that indicate donations to the Metropolitan Opera Company in New York. L. di Cesnola of the Metropolitan Museum of Art sought and received a number of donations to obtain desired individual items or collections for the museum.

The election of Leland Stanford to the U.S. Senate in 1885 put a wedge between Stanford and Huntington that was never fully removed. Huntington had supported his long-time friend and political associate Aaron A. Sargent for the Senate seat and had even persuaded Stanford and Sargent to bury their lang standing feud. When the California electorate returned a Republican majority to the state legislature, Huntington fully expected that Stanford would support Sargent. Instead Stanford ran for the seat and was elected. Huntington feit betrayed and relations between the two were never quite the Same.

Charles Sherrill died in 1887, and John Boyd took over as chief congressional lobbyist. Among the topics discussed in his correspondence of the late 1880s were a proposed investigation of the Pacific railroads by Congress, and the Interstate Commerce Commission's efforts to regulate the railroads.

Inquiries about the interest payments due an bonds of Huntington's companies continue from the New York, Brussels, and Frankfort offices of Speyer and Company. Huntington travelled to Europe in 1887 in an effort to pacify European bondholders whose main complaints were late interest payments and annual company reports which were not quite so annual or accurate. Huntington wrote many letters to his secretary Isaac Edwin Gates while he was in Europe and these appear in this series.

1890s

In the 1890s Huntington became involved with railroads in Africa. Huntington had lang been sympathetic to the plight of blacks in the United States and was a fervent supporter of the earlier anti-slavery movement. He invested in railroads in Africa (the Congo Railroad and the British East Africa Company) because he feit that the railroad would bring civilization to Equitorial Africa and thereby help to end the slave trade. Huntington's involvement with the anti-slavery movement can be followed in the letters of Francis W. Fox and Sir William Mackinnon.

The correspondence for this decade presents the situation that while Huntington made the avowed aim of taking politics out of the railroads he became more and more involved in politics particularly in California. The letters of William Mills show how Huntington manipulated public opinion by purchasing newspapers and attempting to influence others; this at a time when there was much anti-railroad feeling in California. Mills' letters give a day-to-day account of California politics.

Lobbyist Boyd kept Huntington informed of the actions of the Congressional investigations of the railroads. In 1893, Huntington was called to testify before the committee, yet there is little mention of this in the correspondence. Among the topics that occupied the correspondence during the 1890s was the Panic of 1893. Its effects in California are detailed in the letters of William Mills; banks closed, money was tight, and interest payments were due. The associates turned to Stanford for assistance, but he died and his estate was tied up in probate. The question of the free coinage of silver is discussed with William M. Stewart, U.S. Senator from Nevada. The Pullman Strike of 1894 is discussed in letters from Mills. The strike had little effect in California, but it did muck to feed anti-railroad feelings there. Agitation in California against the railroads is mentioned in the correspondence, while in Congress debate continued over a Funding Bill by which the railroads would repay their debts to the government.

The correspondence of the latter part of the 1890s deals mainly with the day-to-day business of running an enormous railroad and steamship empire. One of the last additions to this empire was the Raquette Lake Railway, which allowed Huntington to visit his retreat in the Adirondacks.

By the time of his death on August 13, 1900, Huntington had an interest in the following companies of which this is by no means a complete list:

  • Chesapeake & Ohio Railway Company
  • Galveston, Harrisburg, and San Antonio Railway Company
  • Guatemala Central Railroad Company
  • Louisiana & Western Railroad Company
  • Maysville and Big Sandy Railroad Company
  • Mexican International Railroad Company
  • Newport News and Mississippi Valley Company (another holding company)
  • Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company
  • Occidental and Oriental Steamship Company
  • Old Dominion Land Company
  • Old Dominion Steamship Company
  • Oregon & California Railroad Company
  • Pacific Improvement Company
  • Pacific Mail Steamship Company
  • Raquette Lake Railroad Company
  • Southern Development Company
  • Southern Pacific Coast Railway Company
  • Southern Pacific Company (a holding company the associates formed in 1884)
  • United States and Brazil Steamship Company
  • Western Union Telegraph Company

The incoming correspondence ends with letters of condolence to Issac Edwin Gates from friends and business associates on the death of his friend and employer.

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Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

Preferred citation for this material is as follows:

Collis Potter Huntington Papers
Special Collections Research Center,
Syracuse University Libraries

Acquisition Information

Gift of Anna Hyatt Huntington.

Finding Aid Information

Created by: --
Date: circa 1978
Revision history: 2 Feb 2008 - converted to EAD (MRC); 18 Feb 2011 - mezzotint added (MRC); 10 Jan 2012 - box numbers revised (MBD); 26 Oct 2012 - extent revised (MBD)

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Inventory

Note on alternate formats:

The entire collection is also available on microfilm, both at Syracuse University and at numerous other academic institutions across the country.

Correspondence
Box 1 1856
Box 1 1863
Box 1 1864
Box 1 1865
Box 1 Jan 1866
Box 1 Feb 1866
Box 1 Mar 1866
Box 1 May 1866
Box 1 Jun 1866
Box 1 Jul 1866
Box 1 Sep 1866
Box 1 Dec 1866
Box 1 Jan 1867 (2 folders)
Box 1 Feb 1-25 1867 (2 folders)
Box 1 Mar 1867
Box 1 Apr 1867 (2 folders)
Box 1 May 1-27 1867 (2 folders)
Box 1 June 1-28 1867 (2 folders)
Box 1 July 1867
Box 1 Aug 1867
Box 1 Sep 1867
Box 1 Oct 1867
Box 1 Nov 1867
Box 1 Dec 1867 (2 folders)
Box 1 Jan 1868
Box 1 Feb 1868
Box 1 Mar 1868
Box 2 Apr 1868
Box 2 May 1868
Box 2 June 1868
Box 2 July 1868
Box 2 Aug 1868
Box 2 Sep 1868
Box 2 Oct 1868
Box 2 Nov 1868
Box 2 Dec 1868
Box 2 Jan 1869
Box 2 Feb 1869
Box 2 Mar 1869
Box 2 Apr 1869
Box 2 May 1869 (2 folders)
Box 2 June 1869 (2 folders)
Box 2 July 1-14 1869
Box 3 July 15-31 1869 (2 folders)
Box 3 Aug 1869 (2 folders)
Box 3 Sep 1869
Box 3 Oct 1869
Box 3 Nov 1869 (2 folders)
Box 3 Dec 1869 (2 folders)
Box 4 Jan 2-31 1870 (3 folders)
Box 4 Feb 1870 (3 folders)
Box 4 Mar 1870 (3 folders)
Box 4 Apr 1870 (3 folders)
Box 4 May 1870 (3 folders)
Box 5 June 1870 (3 folders)
Box 5 July 1870 (3 folders)
Box 5 Aug 1-15, 17-31 1870 (4 folders)
Box 5 Sep 1-28 1870
Box 5 Oct 1870 (2 folders)
Box 5 Nov 1870 (2 folders)
Box 5 Dec 1-30 1870 (3 folders)
Box 6 Jan 1871 (3 folders)
Box 6 Feb 1871 (3 folders)
Box 6 Mar 1-30 1871 (3 folders)
Box 6 Apr 1871 (5 folders)
Box 6 May 1871 (4 folders)
Box 7 June 1871 (3 folders)
Box 7 July 1871 (4 folders)
Box 7 Aug 1871 (3 folders)
Box 7 Sep 1871 (4 folders)
Box 7 Oct 1-21, 23-31 1871 (2 folders)
Box 7 Nov 1871 (3 folders)
Box 8 Dec 1-30 1871 (4 folders)
Box 8 Jan 1872 (4 folders)
Box 8 Feb 1872 (4 folders)
Box 8 Mar 1872 (4 folders)
Box 9 Apr 1872 (5 folders)
Box 9 May 1872 (5 folders)
Box 9 June 1-8, 10-29 1872 (5 folders)
Box 9 July 1872 (4 folders)
Box 10 Aug 1-17, 19-31 1872 (5 folders)
Box 10 Sep 1872 (5 folders)
Box 10 Oct 1872 (5 folders)
Box 10 Nov 1872 (4 folders)
Box 11 Dec 1872 (5 folders)
Box 11 Jan 1873 (4 folders)
Box 11 Feb 1873 (3 folders)
Box 11 Mar 1873 (4 folders)
Box 12 Apr 1873 (3 folders)
Box 12 May 1873 (2 folders)
Box 12 June 1873 (2 folders)
Box 12 July 1873 (3 folders)
Box 12 Aug 1-30 1873 (3 folders)
Box 12 Sep 1873 (3 folders)
Box 13 Oct 1873 (2 folders)
Box 13 Nov 1873 (3 folders)
Box 13 Dec 1873 (3 folders)
Box 13 Jan 1874 (3 folders)
Box 13 Feb 1874 (3 folders)
Box 13 Mar 1874 (3 folders)
Box 14 Apr 1874 (3 folders)
Box 14 May 1874 (3 folders)
Box 14 June 1874 (3 folders)
Box 14 July 1874 (3 folders)
Box 14 Aug 1874 (3 folders)
Box 14 Sep 1874 (3 folders)
Box 15 Oct 1874 (3 folders)
Box 15 Nov 1874 (3 folders)
Box 15 Dec 1874 (3 folders)
Box 15 Jan 1875 (3 folders)
Box 15 Feb 1-27 1875 (3 folders)
Box 16 Mar 1875 (3 folders)
Box 16 Apr 1875 (3 folders)
Box 16 May 1875 (3 folders)
Box 16 June 1-8, 11-31 1875 (3 folders)
Box 16 July 1875 (3 folders)
Box 16 Aug 1875 (3 folders)
Box 17 Sep 1875 (3 folders)
Box 17 Oct 1-30 1875 (3 folders)
Box 17 Nov 1875 (3 folders)
Box 17 Dec 1875 (3 folders)
Box 17 Jan 1876 (4 folders)
Box 18 Feb 1876 (3 folders)
Box 18 Mar 1876 (3 folders)
Box 18 Apr 1876 (3 folders)
Box 19 May 1876 (3 folders)
Box 19 June 1876 (3 folders)
Box 19 July 1876 (3 folders)
Box 19 Aug 1-17 1876 (3 folders)
Box 20 Aug 18-31 1876 (2 folders)
Box 20 Sep 1876 (4 folders)
Box 20 Oct 1876 (3 folders)
Box 20 Nov 1876 (3 folders)
Box 20 Dec 1876 (3 folders)
Box 21 Jan 1877 (5 folders)
Box 21 Feb 1877 (4 folders)
Box 21 Mar 1877 (4 folders)
Box 21 Apr 1877 (4 folders)
Box 22 May 1877 (5 folders)
Box 22 June 1877 (4 folders)
Box 22 July 1877 (3 folders)
Box 23 Aug 1877 (3 folders)
Box 23 Sep 1877 (4 folders)
Box 23 Oct 1877 (4 folders)
Box 23 Nov 1877 (4 folders)
Box 24 Dec 1877 (4 folders)
Box 24 Jan 1878 (7 folders)
Box 24 Feb 1878 (4 folders)
Box 25 Mar 1878 (5 folders)
Box 25 Apr 1878 (5 folders)
Box 25 May 1878 (5 folders)
Box 26 June 1878 (4 folders)
Box 26 July 1-30 1878 (3 folders)
Box 26 Aug 1878 (3 folders)
Box 26 Sep 1878 (4 folders)
Box 27 Oct 1878 (5 folders)
Box 27 Nov 1878 (6 folders)
Box 28 Dec 1878 (7 folders)
Box 28 Jan 1879 (8 folders)
Box 29 Feb 1879 (6 folders)
Box 29 Mar 1879 (6 folders)
Box 30 Apr 1-5, 7-30 1879 (5 folders)
Box 30 May 1879 (4 folders)
Box 30 June 1879 (5 folders)
Box 31 July 1879 (4 folders)
Box 31 Aug 1879 (3 folders)
Box 31 Sep 1879 (4 folders)
Box 32 Oct 1879 (4 folders)
Box 32 Nov 1879 (5 folders)
Box 33 Dec 1879 (6 folders)
Box 33 Jan 1880 (7 folders)
Box 34 Feb 1880 (6 folders)
Box 34 Mar 1880 (6 folders)
Box 35 Apr 1880 (7 folders)
Box 35 May 1880 (8 folders)
Box 36 June 1880 (7 folders)
Box 36 July 1880 (6 folders)
Box 37 Aug 1880 (4 folders)
Box 37 Sep 1880 (5 folders)
Box 38 Oct 1880 (6 folders)
Box 38 Nov 1880 (8 folders)
Box 39 Dec 1880 (8 folders)
Box 39 Jan 1-15 1881 (5 folders)
Box 40 Jan 16-31 1881 (5 folders)
Box 40 Feb 1881 (9 folders)
Box 41 Mar 1881 (6 folders)
Box 42 Apr 1881 (10 folders)
Box 43 May 1881 (9 folders)
Box 44 June 1881 (11 folders)
Box 45 July 1881 (9 folders)
Box 45 Aug 1-15 1881 (4 folders)
Box 46 Aug 16-31 1881 (4 folders)
Box 46 Sep 1881 (13 folders)
Box 47 Oct 1881 (10 folders)
Box 48 Nov 1881 (8 folders)
Box 49 Dec 1881 (10 folders)
Box 50 Jan 1882 (10 folders)
Box 51 Feb 1882 (8 folders)
Box 51 Mar 1882 (7 folders)
Box 52 Apr 1882 (9 folders)
Box 52 May 1-14 1882 (4 folders)
Box 53 May 15-31 1882 (5 folders)
Box 53 June 1-14 1882 (5 folders)
Box 54 June 15-30 1882 (5 folders)
Box 54 July 1882 (8 folders)
Box 55 Aug 1882 (5 folders)
Box 55 Sep 1882 (7 folders)
Box 56 Oct 1882 (10 folders)
Box 57 Nov 1882 (8 folders)
Box 58 Dec 1882 (8 folders)
Box 59 Jan 1883 (8 folders)
Box 60 Feb 1883 (8 folders)
Box 60 Mar 1-15 1883 (5 folders)
Box 61 Mar 16-31 1883 (5 folders)
Box 61 Apr 1883 (8 folders)
Box 62 May 1883 (9 folders)
Box 63 June 1883 (7 folders)
Box 64 July 1883 (11 folders)
Box 65 Aug 1883 (10 folders)
Box 66 Sep 1883 (6 folders)
Box 66 Oct 1883 (7 folders)
Box 67 Nov 1883 (7 folders)
Box 68 Dec 1883 (11 folders)
Box 69 Jan 1884 (10 folders)
Box 70 Feb 1884 (13 folders)
Box 71 Mar 1884 (8 folders)
Box 72 Apr 1884 (12 folders)
Box 73 May 1884 (12 folders)
Box 74 June 1884 (10 folders)
Box 75 July 1884 (12 folders)
Box 76 Aug 1-30 1884 (12 folders)
Box 77 Sep 1884 (11 folders)
Box 77 Oct 1-15 1884 (4 folders)
Box 78 Oct 16-31 1884 (4 folders)
Box 78 Nov 1884 (7 folders)
Box 79 Dec 1884 (9 folders)
Box 80 Jan 1885 (13 folders)
Box 81 Feb 1885 (12 folders)
Box 82 Mar 1885 (13 folders)
Box 83 Apr 1885 (8 folders)
Box 83 May 1-30 1885 (8 folders)
Box 84 June 1885 (7 folders)
Box 84 July 1885 (8 folders)
Box 85 Aug 1885 (8 folders)
Box 85 Sep 1885 (6 folders)
Box 86 Oct 1885 (6 folders)
Box 86 Nov 1885 (8 folders)
Box 87 Dec 1885 (11 folders)
Box 88 Jan 1886 (8 folders)
Box 89 Feb 1886 (7 folders)
Box 89 Mar 1886 (6 folders)
Box 90 Apr 1886 (7 folders)
Box 90 May 1886 (6 folders)
Box 91 June 1886 (7 folders)
Box 91 July 1886 (8 folders)
Box 92 Aug 1886 (6 folders)
Box 93 Sep 1886 (7 folders)
Box 93 Oct 1886 (4 folders)
Box 94 Nov 1886 (6 folders)
Box 94 Dec 1886 (8 folders)
Box 95 Jan 1887 (10 folders)
Box 96 Feb 1887 (8 folders)
Box 97 Mar 1887 (8 folders)
Box 98 Apr 1887 (4 folders)
Box 98 May 1887 (6 folders)
Box 99 June 1887 (5 folders)
Box 99 July 1887 (5 folders)
Box 100 Aug 1887 (5 folders)
Box 100 Sep 1887 (3 folders)
Box 100 Oct 1887 (4 folders)
Box 101 Nov 1887 (4 folders)
Box 101 Dec 1887 (4 folders)
Box 102 Jan 1888 (5 folders)
Box 102 Feb 1888 (5 folders)
Box 102 Mar 1888 (5 folders)
Box 103 Apr 1888 (4 folders)
Box 103 May 1888 (3 folders)
Box 103 June 1-22, 25-30 1888 (3 folders)
Box 104 July 1888 (3 folders)
Box 104 Aug 1888 (4 folders)
Box 104 Sep 1-29 1888 (3 folders)
Box 105 Oct 1888 (3 folders)
Box 105 Nov 1888 (2 folders)
Box 105 Dec 1888 (3 folders)
Box 105 Jan 1889 (5 folders)
Box 106 Feb 1889 (3 folders)
Box 106 Mar 1889 (3 folders)
Box 106 Apr 1889 (3 folders)
Box 107 May 1889 (3 folders)
Box 107 June 1889 (2 folders)
Box 107 July 1889 (4 folders)
Box 107 Aug 1889 (2 folders)
Box 108 Sep 1889
Box 108 Oct 1-29 1889
Box 108 Nov 1-29 1889
Box 108 Dec 1-16, 18-31 1889 (2 folders)
Box 108 Jan 1890 (2 folders)
Box 108 Feb 1890
Box 108 Mar 1890
Box 108 Apr 1890 (2 folders)
Box 109 May 1890 (3 folders)
Box 109 June 1890 (4 folders)
Box 109 July 1890 (3 folders)
Box 110 Aug 1890 (3 folders)
Box 110 Sep 1890 (2 folders)
Box 110 Oct 1890 (3 folders)
Box 110 Nov 1890 (3 folders)
Box 111 Dec 1890 (3 folders)
Box 111 Jan 1891 (6 folders)
Box 112 Feb 1891 (3 folders)
Box 112 Mar 1891 (4 folders)
Box 112 Apr 1891 (4 folders)
Box 113 May 1891 (4 folders)
Box 113 June 1891 (3 folders)
Box 113 July 1891 (5 folders)
Box 114 Aug 1891 (3 folders)
Box 114 Sep 1891 (3 folders)
Box 114 Oct 1891 (3 folders)
Box 115 Nov 1891 (3 folders)
Box 115 Dec 1891 (4 folders)
Box 115 Jan 1892 (4 folders)
Box 116 Feb 1-20, 22-29 1892 (4 folders)
Box 116 Mar 1892 (4 folders)
Box 116 Apr 1892 (4 folders)
Box 117 May 1892 (4 folders)
Box 117 June 1892 (4 folders)
Box 117 July 1892 (4 folders)
Box 118 Aug 1892 (4 folders)
Box 118 Sep 1892 (5 folders)
Box 118 Oct 1892 (6 folders)
Box 119 Nov 1892 (2 folders)
Box 119 Dec 1892 (3 folders)
Box 119 Jan 1893 (3 folders)
Box 120 Feb 1893 (4 folders)
Box 120 Mar 1893 (5 folders)
Box 120 Apr 1893 (4 folders)
Box 121 May 1893 (4 folders)
Box 121 June 1893 (4 folders)
Box 121 July 1893 (5 folders)
Box 122 Aug 1893 (2 folders)
Box 122 Sep 1893 (3 folders)
Box 122 Oct 1893 (3 folders)
Box 122 Nov 1893 (3 folders)
Box 122 Dec 1893 (3 folders)
Box 123 Jan 1894 (4 folders)
Box 123 Feb 1894 (3 folders)
Box 123 Mar 1894 (4 folders)
Box 124 Apr 1894 (5 folders)
Box 124 May 1894 (3 folders)
Box 124 June 1894
Box 125 July 1894
Box 125 Aug 1894
Box 125 Sep 1894
Box 125 Oct 1894
Box 125 Nov 1894
Box 125 Dec 1894
Box 125 Jan 1895
Box 125 Feb 1895 (3 folders)
Box 125 Mar 1895 (4 folders)
Box 126 Apr 1-26 1895 (2 folders)
Box 126 May 1895
Box 126 June 1895
Box 126 July 1-30 1895
Box 126 Sep 1895
Box 126 Oct 1895
Box 126 Nov 1895
Box 126 Dec 1895
Box 126 Jan 1896 (2 folders)
Box 126 Feb 1896
Box 127 Mar 1896
Box 127 Apr 1896 (3 folders)
Box 127 May 1896 (2 folders)
Box 127 June 1896
Box 127 July 1896
Box 127 Aug 1896
Box 127 Sep 1896
Box 127 Oct 1-30 1896
Box 127 Nov 1896
Box 127 Dec 1896
Box 127 Jan 1897
Box 128 Feb 1897
Box 128 Mar 1897
Box 128 Apr 1897
Box 128 May 1897
Box 128 June 1897
Box 128 July 1897
Box 128 Aug 1897
Box 128 Sep 1897
Box 128 Oct 1897
Box 128 Nov 1897
Box 128 Dec 1897
Box 128 Jan 1898
Box 128 Feb 1898
Box 128 Mar 1898
Box 128 Apr 1898
Box 128 May 1898
Box 128 June 1-29 1898
Box 129 July 3-30 1898
Box 129 Aug 3-30 1898
Box 129 Sep 1-28 1898
Box 129 Oct 3-31 1898
Box 129 Nov 1898
Box 129 Dec 1898
Box 129 Jan 1899
Box 129 Feb 1899
Box 129 Mar 1899
Box 129 Apr 1-29 1899 (2 folders)
Box 129 May 1-30 1899
Box 130 June 1-28 1899
Box 130 July 5-29 1899
Box 130 Aug 1899
Box 130 Sep 6-29 1899
Box 130 Oct 1-30 1899
Box 130 Nov 1-29 1899
Box 130 Dec 5-29 1899
Box 130 Jan 3-31 1900
Box 130 Feb 1-27 1900
Box 130 Mar 2-31 1900 (2 folders)
Box 130 Apr 2-30 1900 (2 folders)
Box 131 May 1900
Box 131 June 1900
Box 131 July 1900
Box 131 Aug 1900 (2 folders)
Box 131 Sep 1900
Box 131 Oct 1900
Box 131 Nov 1900
Box 131 Dec 1900
Box 131 Fragments
Box 131 Undated and unidentified
Box 131 1904
Letterpress copybooks
Central Pacific Railroad
Box 132 Volume 1 June 20, 1868 - May 7, 1869
Box 132 Volume 2 May 7, 1869 - Jan. 19, 1870
Box 132A Volume 3 Jan. 20, 1870 - June 30, 1871
Box 133 Volume 4 July 1, 1871 - Oct. 31, 1872
Box 133 Volume 5 Oct. 31, 1872 - Oct. 30, 1873
Box 133 Volume 6 Nov. 1, 1873 - Nov. 20, 1874
Box 134 Volume 7 Nov. 20, 1874 - Sept. 17, 1875
Box 134 Volume 8 Sept. 17, 1875 - July 31, 1876
Box 134 Volume 9 Aug. 1, 1876 - Aug. 9, 1877
Box 135 Volume 10 Aug. 9, 1877 - Jan. 31, 1879
Box 135 Volume 11 Feb. 1, 1879 - March 10, 1880
Box 135 Volume 12 March 13, 1880 - Nov. 23, 1880
Box 136 Volume 13 Nov. 23, 1880 - June 17, 1881
Box 136 Volume 14 June 18, 1881 - Jan. 7, 1882
Box 136 Volume 15 Jan. 7, 1882 - June 24, 1882
Box 137 Volume 16 June 26, 1882 - Nov. 24, 1882
Box 137 Volume 17 Nov. 25, 1882 - June 4, 1883
Box 137 Volume 18 June 4, 1883 - Feb. 4, 1884
Box 138 Volume 19 Feb. 4, 1884 - Jan. 30, 1885
Central Pacific Railroad Company (Collis P. Huntington to Charles Crocker, Charles F. Crocker, Mark Hopkins, Leland Stanford, et al.)
Box 138 Volume 20 June 23, 1868 - Aug. 5, 1869
Box 138 Volume 21 Aug. 5, 1869 - Dec. 5, 1870
Box 139 Volume 22 Dec. 6, 1870 - March 26, 1873
Box 139 Volume 23 April 2, 1873 - Aug. 15, 1874
Box 139 Volume 24 Aug. 17, 1874 - April 6, 1875
Box 140 Volume 25 April 6, 1875 - March 22, 1876
Box 140 Volume 26 March 23, 1876 - Sept. 19, 1877
Box 140 Volume 27 Sept. 20, 1877 - May 19, 1880
Box 141 Volume 28 May 20, 1880 - Sept. 29, 1881
Box 141 Volume 29 Sept. 29, 1881 - Dec. 13, 1882
Box 141 Volume 30 Dec. 15, 1882 - Dec. 1, 1883
Box 141 Volume 31 Dec. 4, 1883 - April 17, 1885
Box 142 Volume 32 April 21, 1885 - June 9, 1886
Box 142 Volume 33 June 11, 1886 - Nov. 21, 1887
Box 142 Volume 34 Nov. 22, 1887 - Jan. 4, 1889
Box 142 Volume 35 Jan. 4, 1889 - Aug. 27, 1891
Box 143 Volume 36 Aug. 31, 1891 - Nov. 19, 1891
Central Pacific Railroad Company (Collis P. Huntington - Miscellaneous)
Box 143 Volume 37 April 21, 1880 - April 15, 1881
Box 143 Volume 38 April 15, 1881 - Nov. 14, 1881
Box 143 Volume 39 Nov. 15, 1881 - June 14, 1882
Box 144 Volume 40 June 14, 1882 - May 26, 1883
Box 144 Volume 41 May 26, 1883 - Jan. 11, 1884
Box 144 Volume 42 Jan 12, 1884 - June 23, 1884
Box 144 Volume 43 June 23, 1884 - Feb. 10, 1885
Box 145 Volume 44 Feb. 12, 1885 - March 25, 1885
Central Pacific Railroad Company (Isaac E. Gates)
Box 145 Volume 45 Dec. 15, 1869 - Feb. 24, 1870
Box 145 Volume 46 Feb. 24, 1870 - July 6, 1870
Box 145 Volume 47 July 7, 1870 - March 9, 1871
Box 146 Volume 48 March 9, 1871 - Oct. 18, 1871
Box 146 Volume 49 Oct. 19, 1871 - July 5, 1872
Box 146 Volume 50 July 6, 1872 - Dec. 18, 1872
Box 147 Volume 51 Dec. 19, 1872 - May 20, 1873
Box 147 Volume 52 May 17, 1873 - Jan. 24, 1874
Box 147 Volume 53 Jan. 24, 1874 - July 9, 1874
Box 147 Volume 54 July 10, 1874 - Dec. 21, 1874
Box 148 Volume 55 Dec. 22, 1874 - May 12, 1875
Box 148 Volume 56 May 13, 1875 - Oct. 11, 1875
Box 148 Volume 57 Oct. 12, 1875 - Feb. 16, 1876
Box 148 Volume 58 Feb. 16, 1876 - June 12, 1876
Box 149 Volume 59 June 12, 1876 - Oct. 24, 1876
Box 149 Volume 60 Oct. 24, 1876 - March 1, 1877
Box 149 Volume 61 March 1, 1877 - June 13, 1877
Box 149 Volume 62 June 14, 1877 - Nov. 24, 1877
Box 150 Volume 63 Nov. 26, 1877 - March 1, 1878
Box 150 Volume 64 March 1, 1878 - June 17, 1878
Box 150 Volume 65 June 17, 1878 - Oct. 10, 1878
Box 151 Volume 66 Oct. 11, 1878 - Feb. 25, 1879
Box 151 Volume 67 Feb. 24, 1879 - June 11, 1879
Box 151 Volume 68 June 11, 1879 - Nov. 5, 1879
Box 151 Volume 69 Nov. 6, 1879 - March 6, 1880
Box 152 Volume 70 March 6, 1880 - Aug. 6, 1880
Box 152 Volume 71 Aug. 6, 1880 - Feb. 1, 1881
Box 152 Volume 72 Feb. 2, 1881 - June 21, 1881
Box 152 Volume 73 June 21, 1881 - Oct. 28, 1881
Box 153 Volume 74 Oct. 28, 1881 - Feb. 11, 1882
Box 153 Volume 75 Feb. 11, 1882 - May 2, 1882
Box 153 Volume 76 May 2, 1882 - July 18, 1882
Box 153 Volume 77 July 18, 1882 - Sept. 19, 1882
Box 154 Volume 78 Sept. 20, 1882 - Dec. 7, 1882
Box 154 Volume 79 Dec. 7, 1882 - Jan. 24, 1883
Box 154 Volume 80 Jan. 24, 1883 - March 21, 1883
Box 154 Volume 81 March 21, 1883 - May 16, 1883
Box 155 Volume 82 May 17, 1883 - July 24, 1883
Box 155 Volume 83 July 24, 1883 - Sept. 29, 1883
Box 155 Volume 84 Sept. 29, 1883 - Nov. 20, 1883
Box 155 Volume 85 Nov. 21, 1883 - Jan. 21, 1884
Box 156 Volume 86 Jan. 19, 1884 - March 4, 1884
Box 156 Volume 87 March 4, 1884 - April 14, 1884
Box 156 Volume 88 April 15, 1884 - June 10, 1884
Box 156 Volume 89 June 11, 1884 - July 31, 1884
Box 157 Volume 90 July 31, 1884 - Sept. 16, 1884
Box 157 Volume 91 Sept. 17, 1884 - Nov. 21, 1884
Box 157 Volume 92 Nov. 22, 1884 - Jan. 9, 1885
Box 157 Volume 93 Jan. 9, 1885 - Feb. 24, 1885
Box 158 Volume 94 Feb. 24, 1885 - April 13, 1885
Box 158 Volume 95 April 13, 1885 - July 8, 1885
Box 158 Volume 96 June, July 8, 1885 - Oct. 1885
Box 158 Volume 97 Oct. 7, 1885 - Jan. 21, 1886
Box 159 Volume 98 Jan. 21, 1886 - June 8, 1886
Box 159 Volume 99 May, June 8, 1886 - Sept. 10, 1886
Box 159 Volume 100 Sept. 10, 1886 - Feb. 9, 1887
Box 159 Volume 101 Feb. 9, 1887 - July 11, 1887
Box 160 Volume 102 July 12, 1887 - Jan. 27, 1888
Box 160 Volume 103 Jan. 28, 1888 - June 8, 1888
Box 160 Volume 104 June 9, 1888 - Oct. 24, 1888
Box 160 Volume 105 March 12, 1889 - Aug. 10, 1889
Box 161 Volume 106 July 31, 1889 - Dec. 5, 1889
Box 161 Volume 107 Nov., 1889 - April 25, 1890
Box 161 Volume 108 April 28, 1890 - Dec. 16, 1890
Box 161 Volume 109 Dec. 17, 1890 - Aug. 11, 1891
Box 162 Volume 110 Aug. 10, 1891 - Dec. 31, 1891
Chesapeake and Ohio Railway Company (Collis P. Huntington)
Box 162 Volume 111 Nov. 2, 1870 - July 13, 1872
Box 162 Volume 112 July 22, 1872 - Aug. 22, 1873
Box 163 Volume 113 Aug. 22, 1873 - Feb. 4, 1874
Box 163 Volume 114 Feb. 10, 1874 - Oct. 17, 1874
Box 163 Volume 115 Oct. 17, 1874 - May 1, 1877
Box 163 Volume 116 May 7, 1877 - Dec. 2, 1879
Box 164 Volume 117 Dec. 2, 1879 - Feb. 16, 1881
Box 164 Volume 118 March 8, 1881 - Jan. 14, 1884
Box 164 Volume 119 April 19, 1880 - Jan. 8, 1881
Box 164 Volume 120 Jan. 10, 1881 - May 27, 1881
Box 165 Volume 121 May 27, 1881 - Sept. 17, 1881
Box 165 Volume 122 Sept. 17, 1881 - Feb. 1, 1882
Box 165 Volume 123 Feb. 1, 1882 - June 10, 1882
Box 165 Volume 124 June 10, 1882 - Dec. 30, 1882
Box 166 Volume 125 Jan. 1, 1883 - June 9, 1883
Box 166 Volume 126 June 11, 1883 - Jan. 10, 1884
Box 166 Volume 127 Jan. 12, 1884 - Oct. 10, 1884
Box 166 Volume 128 Oct. 10, 1884 - May 29, 1885
Box 167 Volume 129 May 30, 1885 - Nov. 30, 1885
Box 167 Volume 130 Dec. 1, 1885 - Feb. 16, 1886
Box 167 Volume 131 Feb. 15, 1886 - May 27, 1886
Box 167 Volume 132 May 27, 1886 - July 30, 1886
Chesapeake Dry Dock and Construction Company
Box 168 Volume 133 June 1, 1891 - Dec. 21, 1891
Chesapeake, Ohio and Southwestern Railroad Company
Box 168 Volume 134 June 8, 1881 - Feb. 13, 1882
Box 168 Volume 135 Feb. 16, 1882 - Nov. 14, 1882
Box 168 Volume 136 Nov. 16, 1882 - Aug. 15, 1883
Box 169 Volume 137 Aug. 15, 1883 - Aug. 16, 1884
Box 169 Volume 138 Aug. 19, 1884 - Dec. 26, 1885
Box 169 Volume 139 Dec. 10, 1885 - July 22, 1886
Congo, railroad, proposed
Box 169 Volume 140 June 19, 1889 - Feb. 6, 1890
Contracting and Building Company
Box 170 Volume 141 July 2, 1879 - June 11, 1881
Box 170 Volume 142 June 11, 1881 - March 13, 1885
Box 170 Volume 143 March 5, 1886 - Oct. 19, 1886
Box 170 Volume 144 Oct. 18, 1886 - Feb. 25, 1887
Box 171 Volume 145 Feb. 25, 1887 - June 22, 1887
Box 171 Volume 146 June 22, 1887 - Dec. 14, 1887
Box 171 Volume 147 Dec. 14, 1887 - May 23, 1888
Box 171 Volume 148 May 24, 1888 - Dec. 3, 1888
Box 172 Volume 149 Dec. 3, 1888 - Nov. 17, 1893
Contracting and Building Company (Collis P. Huntington)
Box 172 Volume 150 April 2, 1886 - May 23, 1888
Box 172 Volume 151 May 26, 1888 - Dec. 16, 1891
Elizabethtown, Lexington and Big Sandy Railroad Company
Box 172 Volume 152 June 17, 1871 - Sept. 3, 1874
Elizabethtown, Lexington and Big Sandy Railroad Company (Collis P. Huntington-Miscellaneous)
Box 173 Volume 153 April 19, 1880 - March 3, 1881
Box 173 Volume 154 March 3, 1881 - Sept. 20, 1881
Box 173 Volume 155 Sept. 30, 1881 - Sept. 27, 1882
Box 173 Volume 156 Sept. 25, 1882 - April 14, 1884
Box 174 Volume 157 April 15, 1884 - April 22, 1885
Box 174 Volume 158 April 23, 1885 - Feb. 25, 1886
Box 174 Volume 159 Feb. 25, 1886 - July 20, 1886
Kentucky Central Railroad Company and Chesapeake and Nashville Railroad Company
Box 174 Volume 160 Aug. 2, 1886 - Dec. 28, 1891
Louisville, New Orleans and Texas Railroad Company
Box 175 Volume 161 March 8, 1883 - Dec. 14, 1891
Mississippi Valley Construction Company
Box 175 Volume 162 Aug. 7, 1885 - Nov. 11, 1889
Newport News and Mississippi Valley Company
Box 175 Volume 163 Aug. 2, 1886 - Dec. 20, 1886
Box 175 Volume 164 Dec. 20, 1886 - March 18, 1887
Box 176 Volume 165 March 17, 1887 - Oct. 28, 1887
Box 176 Volume 166 Oct. 28, 1887 - Jan. 21, 1888
Box 176 Volume 167 Jan. 23, 1888 - Dec. 11, 1888
Box 176 Volume 168 Oct. 29, 1888 - Nov. 30, 1889
Box 177 Volume 169 Dec. 2, 1889 - June 29, 1891
Box 177 Volume 170 July 7, 1891 - Jan. 2, 1892
Oregonian Railroad Company
Box 177 Volume 171 Jan. 28, 1890 - Jan. 29, 1891
Scioto Valley Railroad Company
Box 177 Volume 172 Aug. 20, 1886 - Dec. 4, 1890
Southern Development Company
Box 178 Volume 173 May 3, 1881 - Oct. 9, 1882
Southern Pacific Company
Box 178 Volume 174 May 20, 1885 - Aug. 27, 1885
Box 178 Volume 175 Aug. 28, 1885 - Nov. 24, 1885
Box 178 Volume 176 Nov. 27, 1885 - Feb. 19, 1886
Box 179 Volume 177 Feb. 19, 1886 - May 19, 1886
Box 179 Volume 178 May 19, 1886 - Nov. 23, 1886
Box 179 Volume 179 Nov. 22, 1886 - Feb. 28, 1887
Box 179 Volume 180 March 1, 1887 - Sept. 28, 1887
Box 180 Volume 181 Sept. 29, 1887 - Jan. 10, 1888
Box 180 Volume 182 Jan. 9, 1888 - June 20, 1888
Box 180 Volume 183 June 20, 1888 - Dec. 20, 1888
Box 180 Volume 184 Dec. 21, 1888 - July 11, 1889
Box 181 Volume 185 July 11, 1889 - Jan. 30, 1890
Box 181 Volume 186 Feb. 3, 1890 - July 2, 1890
Box 181 Volume 187 July 2, 1890 - Nov. 28, 1890
Box 181 Volume 188 Nov. 28, 1890 - Jan. 29, 1891
Box 182 Volume 189 Dec. 11, 1891 - Dec. 30, 1891
Babbidge, Charles, and T. B. Curtis
Box 182 Volume 190 May 1, 1895 - Nov. 18, 1899
Box 182 Volume 191 Nov. 24, 1899 - Nov. 1, 1900
Butterfield, David
Box 182 Volume 192 July 12, 1882 - Oct. 25, 1883
Colburn, Richard T.
Box 183 Volume 193 Oct. 30, 1875 - Nov. 13, 1877
Box 183 Volume 194 Nov. 6, 1877 - July 1, 1879
Box 183 Volume 195 July 2, 1879 - Dec. 17, 1880
Box 184 Volume 196 Dec. 10, 1880 - June 29, 1882
Box 184 Volume 197 July 1, 1882 - March 6, 1883
Box 185 Volume 198 Feb. 27, 1883 - Oct. 17, 1883
Box 185 Volume 199 Oct. 16, 1883 - Nov. 11, 1884
Box 185 Volume 200 Nov. 14, 1884 - May 22, 1886
Box 186 Volume 201 May 24, 1886 - May 28, 1887
Box 186 Volume 202 May 31, 1887 - Aug. 17, 1888
Davis, Frank H.
Box 186 Volume 203 Feb. 1, 1892 - Nov. 24, 1894
Fillmore, J. A. to Alban N. Towne
Box 186 Volume 204 Dec. 7, 1889 - Feb. 21, 1890
Gates, Isaac Edwin
Box 186 Volume 205 Jan. 2, 1892 - Sept. 15, 1892
Box 187 Volume 206 Sept. 15, 1892 - July 31, 1893
Box 187 Volume 207 July 31, 1893 - July 16, 1894
Gates, Isaac Edwin (Personal)
Box 187 Volume 208 Jan. 17, 1887 - Feb. 20, 1888
Box 187 Volume 209 Feb. 23, 1888 - Nov. 10, 1888
Box 188 Volume 210 March 27, 1889 - July 5, 1889
Box 188 Volume 211 July 5, 1889 - March 18, 1890
Box 188 Volume 212 March 19, 1890 - April 16, 1891
Box 188 Volume 213 April 20, 1891 - June 21, 1894
Gates, Isaac Edwin (Private)
Box 189 Volume 214 Oct. 17, 1892 - June 30, 1893
Box 189 Volume 215 June 30, 1893 - May 1, 1894
Box 189 Volume 216 April 10, 1895 - May 2, 1896
Box 189 Volume 217 May 5, 1896 - July 23, 1897
Box 190 Volume 218 July 26, 1897 - Jan. 14, 1899
Box 190 Volume 219 Jan. 16, 1899 - Jan. 11, 1900
Box 190 Volume 220 Jan. 13, 1900 - Jan. 5, 1901
Huntington, Collis P. (Miscellaneous-Personal)
Box 191 Volume 221 July 14, 1874 - May 20, 1875
Huntington, Collis P. (Private-Personal)
Box 191 Volume 222 Jan. 5, 1889 - Dec. 6, 1889
Huntington, Collis P. (Miscellaneous-Private)
Box 191 Volume 223 Jan. 2, 1892 - Jan. 10, 1892
Box 191 Volume 224 Jan. 11, 1892 - Feb. 15, 1892
Box 191 Volume 225 Feb. 16, 1892 - March 12, 1892
Box 191 Volume 226 March 14, 1892 - May 9, 1892
Box 191 Volume 227 May 10, 1892 - June 13, 1892
Box 192 Volume 228 June 14, 1892 - July 29, 1892
Box 192 Volume 229 Aug. 1, 1892 - Sept. 14, 1892
Box 192 Volume 230 Sept. 17, 1892 - Oct. 7, 1892
Box 192 Volume 231 Oct. 10, 1892 - Nov. 15, 1892
Box 192 Volume 232 Nov. 16, 1892 - Dec. 31, 1892
Box 193 Volume 233 Jan. 1, 1893 - Jan. 31, 1893
Box 193 Volume 234 Feb. 1, 1893 - March 11, 1893
Box 193 Volume 235 March 12, 1893 - April 10, 1893
Box 193 Volume 236 April 11, 1893 - May 15, 1893
Box 194 Volume 237 May 16, 1893 - June 20, 1893
Box 194 Volume 238 June 21, 1893 - June 30, 1893
Box 194 Volume 239 July 1, 1893 - Aug. 17, 1893
Box 194 Volume 240 Aug. 18, 1893 - Sept. 27, 1893
Box 195 Volume 241 Sept. 28, 1893 - Nov. 10, 1893
Box 195 Volume 242 Nov. 16, 1893 - Dec. 30, 1893
Box 195 Volume 243 Jan. 2, 1894 - Feb. 3, 1894
Box 195 Volume 244 Feb. 12, 1894 - March 31, 1894
Box 195 Volume 245 April 4, 1894 - May 7, 1894
Box 196 Volume 246 May 17, 1894 - July 19, 1894
Box 196 Volume 247 July 24, 1894 - Jan. 25, 1895
Box 196 Volume 248 Jan. 30, 1895 - Feb. 2, 1895
Box 196 Volume 249 March 11, 1895 - April 20, 1895
Box 196 Volume 250 May 20, 1895 - Sept. 29, 1896
Box 196 Volume 251 Oct. 1, 1896 - Nov. 15, 1897
Box 197 Volume 252 Nov. 18, 1897 - Sept. 15, 1898
Box 197 Volume 253 Sept. 16, 1898 - March 29, 1899
Box 197 Volume 254 April 5, 1899 - Dec. 15, 1899
Box 197 Volume 255 Dec. 13, 1899 - Feb. 17, 1900
Collis P. to W. V. Huntington and Huntington, Charles F. Crocker
Box 198 Volume 256 Oct. 1, 1878 - Oct. 12, 1883
Telegrams
Box 198 Volume 257 Oct. 19, 1871 - Jan. 29, 1879
Box 198 Volume 258 Jan. 30, 1879 - June 24, 1882
Box 198 Volume 259 June 28, 1882 - March 22, 1888
Box 219 Miscellaneous books
Legal and financial records
Corporate
Box 220 Ashland Improvement Co. 1886
Box 220 Central American Pacific Railway & Transportation Co. 1882
Box 220 Central Pacific Railroad 1870-1872, 1874-1879, 1881-1882, undated
Box 220 Chesapeake & Nashville Railroad 1889
Box 220 Chesapeake & Ohio Railway Co. 1869-1870, 1878-1880, 1882-1889, undated
Box 220 Chesapeake & Ohio Elevator Co. 1881, 1886
Box 220 Chesapeake & Ohio Railway Coal Agency 1877-1885
Box 220 Chesapeake, Ohio & South Western Railroad 1885
Box 220 Congo Railroad Co. 1892
Box 220 Elizabethtown, Lexington & Big Sandy Railroad 1872-1874, 1880, 1887
Box 220 Ensign Manufacturing Co. 1883, 1884, 1887
Box 220 Fisk & Hatch ca. 1873
Box 220 Forest Park Land Co. 1898-1899
Box 220 Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio Railway Co. 1882
Box 220 Hammond Lumber Co. undated
Box 220 Huntington Hopkins Co. 1871, 1874, 1879-1990, 1883-1885, 1887, 1894
Box 220 Huntington Steamship Co. Oct. 1887 - June 18, 1888
Box 220 Kentucky Central Railway Co. 1890
Box 220 Louisville & Nashville Railroad Co. 1889
Box 220 Louisville, Cincinnati & Lexington Railroad 1874-1876
Box 220 Louisville, Evansville & St. Louis Railway Co. 1885
Box 220 Market Street Omnibus Co. 1891-1892
Box 220 Newport News & Mississippi Valley Co. 1889-1893
Box 220 Occidental & Oriental Steamship Co. 1875-1880
Box 220 Old Dominion Steamship Co. 1879, 1893-1898
Box 220 Owensboro, Falls of Rough Green River Railroad Co. 1892
Box 220 Pacific Improvement Co. 1892
Box 220 Raquette Lake Railway Co. 1899-1900, undated
Box 220 Richmond Elevator Co. 1883
Box 220 Southern Development Corp. 1887
Box 220 Southern Pacific Railroad 1879-1880, 1899, undated
Box 220 Texas & New Orleans Railway 1883
Box 220 Western Development Co. 1877-1879, 1882, 1887, undated
Box 220 Unidentified 1871-1891
Personal
Account Books
Cash Book
Box 221 Volume 230 April 1, 1875 - Jan. 1, 1877
Box 221 Volume 231 May 1, 1876 - Dec. 31, 1877
Box 221 Volume 232 Jan. 1, 1878 - Oct. 15, 1878
Oversize 1 Volume 233 Jan., 1886 - April, 1887
Oversize 2 Volume 234 May, 1887 - May, 1888
Oversize 3 Volume 235 June, 1888 - March, 1889
Oversize 4 Volume 236 April, 1889 - Jan. 1, 1890
Day Books
Box 221 Volume 237 Oct. 9, 1871 - Aug. 22, 1874, incl. journal
Box 221 Volume 238 April 5, 1875 - Dec. 30, 1876, incl. journal and cash book
Journals
Oversize 5 Volume 239 Jan., 1886 - Nov. 1888
Oversize 6 Volume 240 Dec., 1888 - Dec., 1889
Oversize 7 Volume 241 Jan., 1890 - Sept. 1891
Oversize 8 Volume 242 Oct. 1891 - Dec., 1892
Oversize 9 Volume 243 Jan., 1893 - Dec., 1893
Oversize 10 Volume 244 Jan., 1894 - Dec., 1894
Oversize 11 Volume 245 Jan., 1895 - June, 1896
Oversize 12 Volume 246 July, 1896 - Aug., 1898
Ledgers
Oversize 13 Volume 247 Jan., 1890 - Dec., 1891
Oversize 14 Volume 248 Jan., 1892 - Dec., 1893
Civil Suits
Box 222 Henry Y. Attree v. Rockaway Beach Improvement Co., Ltd., et al. 1881
Box 222 William Cheney v. Solon Huntington, et al. 1879
Ellen M. Colton v. Leland Stanford, et al.
Box 222 Printed court record, 4 volumes 1883-1885
Court records
Box 222 Volume I Nov. 13, 1883
Box 222 Volume II (fifth day) Nov. 20, 1883
Box 222 Volume III (ninth day) Dec. 4, 1883
Box 222 Volume IV (thirteenth day) Dec. 11, 1883
Box 222 Volume V (seventeenth day) Dec. 18, 1883
Box 223 Volume VI (nineteenth day) Jan. 9, 1884
Box 223 Volume VII (twenty-second day) Feb. 12, 1884
Box 223 Volume VIII (twenty-sixth day) Feb. 19, 1884
Box 223 Volume IX (twenty-ninth day) April 1, 1884
Box 223 Volume X (thirty-third day) April 8, 1884
Box 223 Volume XI (thirty-sixth day) April 23, 1884
Box 224 Volume XII (thirty-ninth day) April 29, 1884
Box 224 Volume XIII (forty-third day) May 6, 1884
Box 224 Volume XIV (forty-sixth day) May 13, 1884
Box 224 Volume XV (forty-ninth day) May 20, 1884
Box 224 Volume XVI (fifty-third day) May 27, 1884
Box 224 Volume XVII (fifty-sixth day) June 3, 1884
Box 225 Volume XVIII (sixtieth day) June 10, 1884
Box 225 Volume XIX (sixty-fourth day) June 17, 1884
Box 225 Volume XX (sixty-eighth day) June 24, 1884
Box 225 Volume XXI (seventy-second day) July 1, 1884
Box 225 Volume XXII (seventy-fourth day) July 8, 1884
Box 226 Volume XXIII (seventy-eighth day) July 22, 1884
Box 226 Volume XXIV (eighty-first day) July 30, 1884
Box 226 Depositions (5 volumes)
Box 227 Defense arguments (5 volumes)
Box 227 Digest of testimony
Box 227 Plaintiff arguments (2 volumes)
Box 227 Index of evidence
Box 227 Index of testimony (3 volumes)
Box 228 Colton v. Stanford, notes of counsel for the defense 1883-1885 (4 folders)
Supporting material for the defense
Account Books of David D. Colton
Box 228 Cash book (Volume 295) Sept. 1, 1874 - April 1, 1875
Oversize 15 Journals (Volumes 296 and 297 January 1, 1877-October 9, 1878
Box 228 Ledger (Volumes 298, 299) April, 1875 - Oct. 1878 (2 volumes)
Statements of Account
Oversize 15 D. D. Colton with London & San Francisco Bank Ltd. (Volume 300) Jan. 1, 1870 - Nov. 25, 1878
Box 228 D. D. Colton with First National Gold Bank (Volume 301) Jan. 1, 1871 - Oct. 22, 1877
Box 228 D. D. Colton with ??? April 20, 1876 - Oct. 9, 1878
Box 228 D. D. Colton with Western Development Co. (Volume 302) July 13, 1876 - Oct. 17, 1878
Box 228 Central Pacific Railway Co. with D. D.Colton (Volume 303) June 20, 1876 - Dec. 4, 1878
Box 228 Pacific Improvement Co. with Western Development Co. (Volume 304) Nov. 6, 1878 - June 30, 1879
Box 228 Western Development Co. with D. D. Colton (Volume 305) Nov. 8, 1876 - July 30, 1879
Deposit slips for D. D. Colton
Box 228 London and San Francisco Bank, Ltd. Jan. 1, 1874 - Dec. 31, 1875
Box 229 London and San Francisco Bank, Ltd. Apr. 1, 1875 - Sept. 17, 1878
Check books of D.D. Colton
Oversize 16-1 Volume 306 Dec. 30, 1873 - Aug. 25, 1875
Oversize 16-2 Volume 307 Aug. 25, 1875 - Aug. 27, 1877,
Oversize 16-3 Volume 308 Nov. 15, 1875 - April 15, 1877,
Oversize 16-4 Volume 309 Aug. 25, 1877 - March 12, 1878,
Box 229 List of checks drawn in favor of D. D. Colton (Volume 310) June 12, 1875 - Oct. 1, 1878
Box 229 Notes and bills payable of D. D. Colton (Volume 311) Oct. 16, 1876 - Sept. 2, 1878
Box 229 Assets and liabilities of Western Development Co. (Volume 312) Aug. 27, 1879
Box 229 Memoranda of agreement between D. D. Colton and others (Volume 313) Jan. 23, 1877
Box 229 Leopold Goldsmith v. Solon Huntington et al. 1879
Box 229 Chew Heong v. United States, dissenting opinion of Justice Field 1884
Edward J. Muybridge v. Leland Stanford
Box 229 Correspondence 1883
Box 229 Notices, plaintiff's declaration, defendant's answer 1883
Box 229 Depositions 1883 (5 folders)
Box 229 Miscellaneous 1883
Box 229 Charles B. Polheums v. Charles Mayne 1892 - subpoena
Box 230 David Stewart v. Collis P. Huntington, et al. May, 1883 - proceedings at trial on circuit
Box 230 United States v. M. Crooks, et al. 1884 - transcript on appeal
Investment ledgers
Box 231 Stocks (Volume 316) February 1876-March 1878
Box 231 Investments (Volume 317) October 1876-October 1878
Box 231 Register of securities (Volume 318) January 2, 1890-December 10, 1902
Box 231 Securities (Volume 319) April 1892-Dec 1899
Loans payable and receivable
Box 231 Notes payable 1872, 1892
Box 231 Double book I, Notes payable, notes receivable December 21, 1892-June 1, 1897, June 30, 1881-June 10, 1890
Box 232 Double book II, Notes payable, notes receivable (Volume 320) December 1895-December 1899
Box 232 Double book III, Mortgages payable and receivable May 1, 1867-June 19, 1890, March 9, 1868-June 13, 1890
Personal Bills
Box 232 1863
Box 232 1867-1869 (3 folders)
Box 233 1870-1877 (9 folders)
Box 234 1878-1881 (8 folders)
Box 235 1882-1884 (Oct) (13 folders)
Box 236 1884 (Nov)-1884
Box 236 1885-1888, 1890-1895, undated
Oversize 17 Oct 1892-Dec 1896 (Volume 324)
Oversize 18 Jan 1897-Jul 1899 (Volume 325)
Oversize 19 Aug 1899-Aug 1900 (Volume 326)
Real Estate
California
Box 236 Butte County 1892
Box 236 San Francisco, Colton House 1892-1894, 1896 - bills and receipts (11 folders)
Box 236 San Francisco 1899 - property tax receipts for several lots
Box 236 Santa Monica 1892
Connecticut
Box 237 Bridgeport 1875, 1880
Box 237 Cornwall 1873-1875
Box 237 Harwinton 1885-1888 (5 folders)
Box 237 Middletown 1868-1869
Box 237 Wolcottville 1856-1870
Kentucky
Box 237 Louisville 1883-1895 (2 folders)
Box 237 Meade County 1889
Louisiana
Box 237 Lafayette Parish 1886
Mississippi
Box 237 Lincoln County - mill property 1885
Box 237 New Brunswick 1886
New Jersey
Box 237 Warwick, Pine Island Farm 1797-1866, 1878-1881, 1884-1890 (3 folders)
New York
Box 238 Brooklyn, Clifton Place 1867-1876, 1881-1891 (3 folders)
Box 238 Brooklyn, 656 Nostrand Ave. 1875-1900 (2 folders)
Box 238 Brooklyn, Stockholm St. 1877-1889
Box 238 Brooklyn, Van Buren St. 1881
Box 238 Mount Pleasant 1885
New York City
Box 238 City Island, Belden Point 1888-1906, 1909, 1912 (6 folders)
Box 239 80th St. near Madison Ave. 1870-1894
Box 239 5th Ave. & 80th St. 1868-1973, 1881-1891 (5 folders)
Box 239 5th Ave. & 72nd St. 1885-1899
Box 239 5 W. 51st St. 1882-1887
Box 239 4 W. 54th St. 1884-1885
Box 239 W. 59th St. 1888-1894
Box 239 2 W. 57th St. 1888-1893 (Jul) (8 folders)
Box 240 2 W. 57th St. 1893 (Aug)-1896, 1899, undated - last folder has photograph of bedroom suite (8 folders)
Box 240 65 Park Ave. 1867-1900
Box 240 Fourth Universalist Society PEW 1868
Box 240 109 Lexington Ave. 1874-1875, 1887
Box 240 Riverside Drive 1880
Box 241 Saint Ann's St. 1869-1898 (3 folders)
Box 241 124 E. 38th St. 1865-1890
Box 241 126 E. 38th St. 1885-1896
Box 241 118 W. 39th St. 1887, 1891-1892
Box 241 property and water taxes for properties 1872-1894
Box 241 Oneonta 1853-1878 (Oct) (6 folders)
Box 242 Oneonta 1878 (Nov)-1890, undated (6 folders)
Box 242 Raquette Lake 1890, 1893, 1895, 1898-1901, undated (3 folders)
Box 242 Throgg's Neck, The Homestead 1884-1889
Box 243 Westchester, Westchester Library and Reading Room 1890-1896 (14 folders)
Box 243 Westchester, Woodlawn Cemetery 1876
Ohio
Box 244 Cincinnati 1883-1886 (2 folders)
Box 244 Columbus 1887
Box 244 Mount Pleasant 1886
Tennessee
Box 244 Memphis 1881-1889
Texas
Box 244 Galveston, Virginia Point 1883, 1891, 1893
Box 244 Hays County, Belle Farm 1886
Virginia
Box 244 Hampton, Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute 1880-1885, 1888-1893 (5 folders)
West Virginia
Box 244 St. Albans, Abbott Hall 1874-1880
Record of Real Estate and Buildings
Oversize 20 Volume 327 1890-1896
Oversize 21 Volume 328 1897-1900
Box 244 Statements of account 1869-1870, 1873, 1876, 1878-1879, 1882-1898 (4 folders)
Miscellaneous
Box 245 Financial statements Oct 1893-Aug 1900
Box 245 Last Will and Testament of Collis P. Huntington 1897
Box 245 Miscellaneous 1872, 1881, 1889, 1898
Personal papers
Biographical Material
Box 246 Autobiographical letter written by Collis P. Huntington to James Speyer, tsc, 24pp Dec. 6, 1899
Box 246 Autobiographical notes, edited with biographical notes by Charles Nordhoff, ts, rev, holo undated
Box 246 Genealogical material collected by the Rev. E. B. Huntington, Incl. corr. 1863-1873
Box 246 Personal memorandum book 1862-1868
Material Relating to Collis P. Huntington's Business and Philanthropic Interests
Box 246 African Interests 1889-1890
Organizational records
Box 246 Austin and Northwestern Railway ca. 1883
Box 246 Central Pacific Railroad 1865, 1871-1872, 1875-1880, 1882, 1885, 1892, undated
Box 246 Chatteroi Railway undated
Box 246 Chesapeake and Ohio Railway Co. 1874, 1878-1880, 1885-1886, 1888-1889, undated
Box 246 Chesapeake Dry Dock and Construction Co. 1887
Box 246 Chesapeake, Ohio and Southwestern Railroad 1883
Box 246 Cincinnati, Indianapolis, St. Louis & Chicago Railway Co. 1881
Box 246 Cincinnati, Portsmouth, Big Sandy and Pomeroy Packet Co. 1881
Box 246 Columbus, Hocking Valley and Toledo Railway 1881
Box 246 Congo Railway Co. 1889-1893
Box 246 Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. 1879?
Oversize 22 Contracting and Building Co., stockholders' minutes, Volume 328 1871-1879
Box 246 Denver and Rio Grande Railroad Co. 1887
Box 246 Edison United Manufacturing Co. 1888
Box 246 Edmonson County Coal and Iron Co. 1889
Box 246 Elevated Railways of New York 1884
Box 246 Elizabethtown, Lexington and Big Sandy Railroad 1870, 1876, 1878-1880
Box 246 Ensign Manufacturing Co. 1872, 1889, 1891, 1893-1894, 1898
Box 246 Forest Park-Land Co. 1900
Box 246 Fort Scott, Wichita & Western Railway Co. 1887
Box 246 Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe Railroad Co. 1883
Box 246 Imperial British East India Co. 1889
Box 246 Kansas, Fort Scott and Memphis Railroad Co. 1888-1889
Box 246 Louisville, New Albany and St. Louis Railway Co. 1880
Box 246 Low Moor Iron Co. 1879, 1882-1887
Box 246 Marietta and North Georgia Railway Co. 1887
Box 246 Market Street Cable Railway Co. 1891-1892
Box 246 Metropolitan Opera House Co. of New York, Ltd. 1888, 1892
Box 246 Metropolitan Trust Co. 1884-1885, 1890
Box 246 Newport News and Mississippi Valley Co. 1887-1888
Box 246 Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co. 1893, 1899, undated
Box 246 New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Co. 1887
Box 246 New York Stock Exchange 1887
Box 246 Occidental & Oriental Steamship Co. 1875, 1878
Box 246 Old Dominion Steamship Co. 1885, 1893
Box 246 Pacific Improvement Co. 1882, 1897
Box 247 Paducah and Memphis Railroad, minutes of Reorganization, trustee's Minute Book 1876-1880
Box 247 Pennsylvania Co. 1887 (2 folders)
Box 247 Pintsch Lighting Co. 1887
Box 247 Raquette Lake Railway Co. 1900, undated
Box 247 Richmond & Danville Railroad Co. 1887
Richmond Elevator Co. 1885, 1887, 1891
Box 247 Sacramento Valley Railroad 1875
Box 247 Scioto Valley Railway 1884 - locomotive specifications
Box 247 Southern Pacific Railroad 1875-1880, 1892
Box 247 Spring Mountain (Lehigh) Coal Co. 1872
Box 247 Suspension Car/Truck Manufacturing Co. 1881
Box 247 Texas & New Orleans Railway 1881, 1885
Box 247 Western Union Telegraph Co. 1882, 1883, 1885, 1887, 1888 - quarterly reports
Miscellaneous
Box 247 Materials regarding possible steel mill and gun manufacturing concern at Newport News 1897-1898
Box 247 Proposal for a railroad from Columbus, Ohio, to Maysville, Kentucky undated
Box 247 Report on Los Angeles Cable Railway Co. ca. 1891
Box 247 Report regarding potentialities for a railroad in the Little Kanawha Valley ca. 1892
Box 247 Stock Exchange Statements Feb. 1887-Nov. 1889
Box 247 Unidentified 1885
Miscellany
Memorabilia
Box 247 Invitations 1879, 1891
Box 247 Lists of guests at Collis P. Huntington's annual dinners in San Francisco 1889, 1892
Box 247 Membership certificate of Collis P. Huntington in the Geographical Society of the Pacific 1890
News clippings
Box 247 1890, 1893-1894, 1896-1897, 1899
Box 247 1894 The Tammany Times
Oversize 23A Nov 1898 "Record of Fraud," The Examiner
Box 247 1900 (4 folders)
Oversize 23 Aug 1900
Box 247 1902, 1904, 1911
Box 247 1924, 1928, 1929, 1934
Box 247 Undated
Portraits
Box 247 Cartoons, (reprints and photo dup.) 1896-1897
Box 247 Engraving ca. 1896
Oversize 24 Engravings, Collis P. Huntington ca. 1899
Oversize 24 Mezzotint, Collis P. Huntington
Box 247 Photo repro of painting of Collis P. Huntington by Francis Lathrop undated
Photographs
Box 247 Collis P. Huntington, middle age
Box 248 Collis P. Huntington, late middle age (6 prints)
Box 248 Collis P. Huntington ca. 1896 (7 prints, 1 negative, 1 modern print)
Box 248 Collis P. Huntington, by William Keith 1899 (6 prints, 1 negative)
Oversize 24 Collis P. Huntington, by William Keith 1899
Oversize 24 Collis P. Huntington, by William Keith ca. 1900
Photographs, other than C.P.H.
Box 248 New York City, 2 W. 57th St. - photo of bedroom suite
Box 248 Pine Knot undated (2 prints)
Box 248 Pine Knot ? undated (4 mounted prints)
Box 248 Unidentified undated (probably 1872-1873) - by Watkins' Yosemite Art Gallery
Box 248 Program of memorial service for Collis P. Huntington, San Francisco Aug. 17, 1900
Box 248 Resolutions of appreciation 1883, undated
Box 248 Report card of C. W. Huntington 1872
Other
Box 248 Holstein-Friesian Assoc. of America 1882, 1884-1886 - registry and transfer certificates
Box 248 Maps undated
Box 248 Open letter to the President of the United States re. political situation in California from Edward Curtis Apr. 15, 1885
Box 248 Recipe for Russian remedy for consequences of the grippe undated
Box 248 Specifications and accoutrements for railroad car Oneonta 1883, 1887-1888, 1892
Box 248 Specifications of sea-going steam yacht 1886
Box 248 Speech delivered on behalf of Collis P. Huntington, Durango, Mexico, holo Nov. 1, 1892
Box 248 Transportation references and memoranda from files of New York Tribune 1875-1902
Box 248 Unidentified undated
Printed material
Box 248 "Address of C. P. Huntington before the Committee on Pacific Railroads of the House of Representatives." Volume 334 March 12, 1896
Box 248 "The Central Pacific Railroad Company in Equitable Account with the U.S.: Review of Testimony and Exhibits Presented Before the Pacific Railway Commission." Volume 335 1887
Box 248 "Central Pacific Settlement: Letters from J. C. Stubbs to C. P. H." Volume 336 1896
Box 248 Circulars, etc. 1875-1897, undated
Box 248 Circulars re. the Funding Bill 1896
Box 248 "Debate on the Pacific Railroad Funding Bill, Delivered in the House of Representatives." Volume 337 January 7, 8, 9, and 11, 1897
Box 248 "How Congressmen are Bribed: The Colton Letters." Volume 338 1896
Box 249 "The Railways and the United States Land Office," by Henry Beard 1883
Box 249 "Remarks of Hon. James G. Maguire Before H. R. Committee on Pacific Railroads, ." June 4, 1894
Box 249 "Report of Discussion Between the House and Senate Committees on Pacific Railroads and C. P. Huntington." January 23-24, 1890
Box 249 Speech "Our Country" by C. P. Huntington May 13, 1899
Box 249 "The Texas Pacific Railway Contrasted with a Real Southern Pacific Railroad by Thomas Norwood 1878
Box 249 "Thirty-Second Parallel Pacific Railroad. Remarks of C. P. Huntington Before the Committee on the Pacific Railroads." Jan. 31, 1878
Box 249 "Transcript of Hearings Before Senate Committee on the Pacific Railroads." (Volumes 345, 346) 1896
Box 249 "Views of the Minority of H.R. Committees on the Pacific Railroad." (Volume 347) Apr 27, 1896
Duplicates
Box 249 Clippings
Box 249 Printed material
Box 249 Receipts and bills
Box 249 Re. Africa
Box 249 Unidentified notes
Weeds
Box 249 Miscellaneous material weeded from collection (9 folders)
Indexes
Box 250 Subject headings (A-L, Ma-Z) (2 boxes index cards)
Box 250 Index (A-D, E-Ho) (2 boxes index cards)
Box 251 Index (Hu-Mc, M-Sp, St-Z) (3 boxes index cards)

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