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Oneida Community Collection

In 1960 Syracuse University Library acquired complete runs of the serial publications of Oneida Community and of its antecedents and branches, covering the span of years from 1837 until 1879. In 1983 the Library received a large collection of the surviving records of the Community. We are happy to be able to provide these additional primary documents for the scholars from Syracuse and elsewhere who have been coming to us for many years.

Some Oneida Community documents have been digitized.  Transcriptions are available online on the References page.

About the Collection

There have been several reasons for the Syracuse University Library to collect materials about Oneida Community and its antecedents and branches.Oneida Community Mansion

For more than sixty years the Library has been assembling data on social-religious movements of New York State during the 19th century as part of its collecting policy to include "local history"-with chief emphasis on the geographical region of Central New York within a radius of approximately fifty miles from Syracuse.

The main body of materials in this field consists of the papers of Gerrit Smith (1797-1874), "philanthropist and reformer," and of his father Peter Smith (1768-1837), wealthy land owner and business associate of the first John Jacob Astor. Their papers cover a wide range of subject matter-land history of New York State, commercial and social relationships with the Indians, the trading post at Old Fort Schuyler (now Utica), abolition, and a multiplicity of reforms (temperance, vegetarianism, "free" churches, socialism, inter al.).

In 1960 Syracuse University Library acquired complete runs of the serial publications of Oneida Community and of its antecedents and branches, covering the span of years from 1837 until 1879. In 1983 the Library received a large collection of the surviving records of the Community. We are happy to be able to provide these additional primary documents for the scholars from Syracuse and elsewhere who have been coming to us for many years.

We believe that we have the largest group of Oneida Community historical materials in existence. Consequently, we plan to publish electronically as many of these documents as possible to acquaint you with this major collection of materials in the field of American social reform of the 19th century.Photo: Oneida Community Women

A list of general social reform publications, not Oneida Community, has been included since these contain accounts of many socialistic experiments in the United States and in England.

It goes without saying that our holdings are available for the use of responsible scholars.

(From The Oneida Community Collection in the Syracuse University Library. 1961, revised 1998)

The Oneida Community Mansion House is open to the public for a variety of functions. For more information, please visit their website at http://www.oneidacommunity.org/.

This digitization project was supported by Regional Bibliographic Databases and Interlibrary Resources Sharing Program funds, awarded by the New York State Library. 1998-

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